journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489572/treatment-options-for-pilonidal-sinus
#1
Mary-Margaret Kober, Usha Alapati, Amor Khachemoune
Pilonidal sinus disease often presents as a chronic problem in otherwise healthy hirsute men. A range of conservative techniques to surgical flaps have been employed to treat this condition. We review the literature on management of pilonidal sinus disease, including conservative and surgical techniques as well as novel laser therapy. Given current evidence, off-midline repair is now considered the standard of care; however, no statistically significant difference has been noted between primary versus secondary closure or between the Karydakis flap and Limberg flap...
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489571/cross-contamination-of-pathology-specimens-a-cautionary-tale
#2
Stephen W Lewellis, Katherine Roy, Linda Gojenola, Susan M Swetter, Kerri E Rieger
There are many potential sources of error in clinical practice. An astute clinician must not only work hard to prevent errors but also minimize harmful sequelae that could arise from errors that do occur. A rare but real source of error is cross-contamination of pathology specimens. Such contaminants are colloquially referred to as floaters. If not recognized expediently, floaters can lead to misdiagnoses that may prompt unnecessary and inappropriate treatment. We report the case of a patient with a benign adnexal neoplasm on the face that, due to cross-contamination of pathology specimens, was initially diagnosed as an aggressive invasive melanoma that would have warranted wide local excision and sentinel lymph node biopsy...
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489570/concomitant-fibrofolliculoma-and-trichodiscoma-on-the-abdomen
#3
Jessica Riley, Leela Athalye, Donna Tran, Stephanie Fogelson, Paul Shitabata
Fibrofolliculoma and trichodiscoma are adnexal tumors that arise from or around hair follicles and are two of the many characteristic features of Birt-Hogg-Dubé (BHD) syndrome. Fibrofolliculoma and other hair follicle hamartomas can be differentiated from their clinically indistinct counterparts (eg, trichodiscomas, trichoadenomas) by histologic and staining comparison. We report a rare case of a 54-year-old man who presented with a subcutaneous papule on the abdomen that was histologically proven to have features of both a solitary fibrofolliculoma and trichodiscoma...
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489569/cutaneous-angiosarcoma-of-the-lower-leg
#4
Jaclyn Scholtz, Manisha M Mishra, Richard Simman
Angiosarcoma is a vascular malignancy that can affect various anatomic sites. Although rare, cutaneous angiosarcoma is the most common clinical manifestation, accounting for approximately 50% to 60% of cases. Cutaneous angiosarcoma typically is known to occur in 3 settings: (1) idiopathic, (2) following radiation treatment, and (3) in the setting of chronic lymphedema following mastectomy (known as Stewart-Treves syndrome). The clinical manifestation of angiosarcoma can mimic other processes. We present a case of cutaneous angiosarcoma on the leg in an elderly woman in the setting of a chronic nonhealing wound and lymphedema...
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489568/what-would-i-tell-my-intern-year-self
#5
Ellen H de Moll
The preliminary year before dermatology training can be the source of much anxiety. However, there are aspects of it that can be rewarding and even fun. Herein, I present some of my own experiences as well as those of colleagues to help relieve stress and hopefully focus on the positive aspects of this busy year and the transition into dermatology training.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489567/mohs-micrographic-surgery-overlying-a-pacemaker
#6
Joshua E Lane, Andrew C Anderson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489566/autoimmune-progesterone-dermatitis
#7
Ivy DeRosa, Brett Bender, Michael Centilli
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489565/solitary-exophytic-plaque-on-the-left-groin
#8
Burak Tekin, Cuyan Demirkesen, Mehmet Salih Gürel
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489564/pigmented-pruritic-macules-in-the-genital-area
#9
Myron Zhang, Benjamin Kaffenberger
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489563/diffuse-nonscarring-alopecia
#10
Laura A Greyling, Samantha E Lee, Jake E Turrentine
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489562/bilateral-brown-plaques-behind-the-ears
#11
Sarah Mattessich, Pamela Aubert, Adam Rees
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489561/mobile-app-rankings-in-dermatology
#12
Emily Tongdee, Orit Markowitz
As technology continues to advance, so too does its accessibility to the general population. Mobile applications (apps) have become a part of the medical field, with dermatology being no exception. There are various types of dermatology apps, including teledermatology, self-surveillance, disease guide, reference, dermoscopy, conference, education, photograph storage and sharing, and journal apps, and others. In this study, we examined the types of dermatology apps targeting patients and physicians that are most popular by analyzing their rankings in the Apple App Store...
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489560/noninvasive-vaginal-rejuvenation
#13
Peter W Hashim, John K Nia, John Zade, Aaron S Farberg, Gary Goldenberg
Vaginal rejuvenation procedures are designed to improve the aesthetic appearance and/or function of the female genitalia. The popularity of these techniques continues to increase as more patients seek to reverse the effects of aging, childbearing, and/or hormonal changes. Newer strategies focus on laser and radiofrequency (RF) devices, which have provided noninvasive options for treatment. In this article, we review the safety and efficacy data behind these modalities.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489559/aquatic-antagonists-lionfish-pterois-volitans
#14
Henry Tomlinson, Dirk M Elston
Lionfish ( Pterois volitans ) are an invasive species originally from the Indian and Pacific oceans and the Red Sea that now are found all along the southeastern coast of the United States. Prompt and comprehensive treatment provides benefit to the patient. As lionfish numbers continue to increase, physicians across multiple specialties and regions may see an increase in envenomation injuries. It is important that physicians are aware of how to recognize and treat lionfish stings.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489558/investing-in-the-future-of-inpatient-dermatology-the-evolution-and-impact-of-specialized-dermatologic-consultation-in-hospitalized-patients
#15
Sergey Rekhtman, Allireza Alloo
Inpatient dermatology has transitioned from units that admitted and cared for patients with chronic dermatoses to consultative services that provide a wide breadth of care, leading to a paradigm shift in the role and impact of dermatologists in the inpatient setting. Consultative dermatology provides a distinct and essential service in the care of hospitalized patients, leading to improved care quality along with reductions in inappropriate health care spending.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489557/multiple-pink-papules-on-the-chest-and-upper-abdomen
#16
Robert A Kowtoniuk, Christine A Schleich, Tammie C Ferringer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489556/erythematous-verrucous-plaque-on-the-hand
#17
Evelyn Yw Yee, Siew E Choon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489555/is-vitiligo-in-vogue-the-changing-face-of-vitiligo
#18
May Elgash, Susan C Taylor
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489554/primary-cutaneous-apocrine-carcinoma-arising-within-a-nevus-sebaceus
#19
Natalie Edgar, Ryan A Schuering, David Esguerra, Richard A Miller, Kaisa van der Kooi
Nevus sebaceus (NS)(organoid nevus) is a benign follicular neoplasm that commonly occurs on the scalp, face, or neck. With time, it may give rise to benign or malignant tumors such as trichoblastoma, syringocystadenoma papilliferum, and basal cell carcinoma (BCC). Rarely, other types of neoplasms may develop. We present a 76-year-old woman with several trichoblastomas as well as a primary cutaneous apocrine carcinoma arising within a preexisting NS that was treated with frozen section excision.
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30489553/xanthogranulomatous-reaction-to-trametinib-for-metastatic-malignant-melanoma
#20
Michelle S Min, Jonathan Yao, Nicole Chee, Allen N Sapadin, Helen Shim-Chang
Trametinib, a mitogen-activated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK) inhibitor, has demonstrated great promise in treating metastatic melanoma associated with BRAF V600E and V600K mutations; however, it also is highly associated with cutaneous adverse events (AEs). As both BRAF and MEK inhibitors become increasingly used to treat malignant melanoma, it is important to better characterize these AEs so that we can manage them. Herein, we present a case of a 66-year-old man who developed erythematous scaly papules on the face and bilateral upper extremities after beginning therapy with trametinib...
October 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
journal
journal
21064
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"