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Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554171/treatment-of-melasma-using-tranexamic-acid-what-s-known-and-what-s-next
#1
Sarah L Sheu
Tranexamic acid is a procoagulant agent that is approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for treatment of menorrhagia and to prevent hemorrhage in patients with hemophilia undergoing tooth extractions. Through its inhibitory effects on the plasminogen activation pathway, tranexamic acid also mitigates the UV radiation-induced pigmentation response. Systemic tranexamic acid has consistently been reported as an effective treatment of melasma, though its broad use may be limited by the risk for thromboembolism...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554170/atypical-presentation-of-acquired-angioedema
#2
David Baird, Timothy J Craig, Jeffrey J Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554169/metastatic-melanoma-and-prostatic-adenocarcinoma-in-the-same-sentinel-lymph-node
#3
Michael Saco, Jonathan Zager, Jane Messina
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554168/carcinoma-erysipeloides-of-papillary-serous-ovarian-cancer-mimicking-cellulitis-of-the-abdominal-wall
#4
Vivian Wong, Carol E Cheng, Steven R Tahan, Caroline C Kim
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554167/hypopigmented-discoloration-on-the-thigh
#5
Sarah Stierman, Nastassja Bedford-Lyon
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554166/asymptomatic-erythematous-plaques-on-the-scalp-and-face
#6
Ezgi Ozkur, Mehmet S Gurel, Ayşe Ek Aksu, Aslı Vt Erdemir, Cem Leblebici
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554165/blueberry-muffin-rash-secondary-to-hereditary-spherocytosis
#7
Lisa M Daum, Lindsay R Sklar, Darius R Mehregan
The term blueberry muffin rash is used to describe the clinical presentation of dermal extramedullary hematopoiesis. The common culprits of this rash include a TORCH (toxoplasmosis, other agents, rubella, cytomegalovirus, herpes) infection or hematologic dyscrasia. Association of this rash with hereditary spherocytosis is extremely rare. We present a unique case of a neonate born with a blueberry muffin rash secondary to hereditary spherocytosis.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554164/what-s-eating-you-sand-flies
#8
Tyler J Willenbrink, Dirk M Elston
As thousands of Americans descended upon Brazil for the Olympic games in the summer of 2016, the mosquito-borne Zika virus became a source of great concern among the countless athletes and travelers in Rio. As is often the case, the media frenzy that ensued drew travelers' attention away from a lesser known flying vector that often carries with it grave consequences. The Phlebotominae, commonly known as sand flies, are biting insects known for their ability to transmit the protozoa Leishmania as well as a number of other viruses and bacteria...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554163/smallpox-vaccine-complications-the-dermatologist-s-role-in-diagnosis-and-management
#9
Janelle Robertson, Jason Susong, Emily B Wong
In 2002, the United States implemented a new program for smallpox vaccinations among military personnel using a live vaccinia virus product. Approximately 2.4 million US military service members and health care workers have since been inoculated, with considerable numbers experiencing adverse reactions. Military dermatologists are at the forefront of describing and treating these reactions, from relatively benign generalized vaccinia (GV) and erythema multiforme (EM) to more severe progressive vaccinia (PV) and eczema vaccinatum (EV)...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554162/growing-nodule-on-the-arm
#10
Elizabeth Kream, Abida Kadi, Lisa Mask-Bull, Virginia A Tracey, Lacey Sullivan, Andrea Murina
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554161/a-new-era-for-physician-patient-communication-in-dermatology
#11
Perla Calderón, Karen Valenzuela, Viviana Zemelman, Miguel Espinoza
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554160/enlarging-red-papulonodule-on-the-chest
#12
Sheila Shaigany, Cory L Simpson, Robert G Micheletti
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554159/pain-minimizing-strategies-for-nail-surgery
#13
Shari R Lipner
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554158/us-dermatology-residency-program-rankings-based-on-academic-achievement
#14
Aram A Namavar, Voy Marczynski, Young M Choi, Jashin J Wu
This study provides rankings of individual US dermatology residency programs based on a number of factors, including annual amount of National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding received in 2014, number of publications by full-time faculty members in 2014, and number of faculty lectures given at 5 annual society meetings. The overall ranking of the top 20 US dermatology residency programs is given as well as the top 5 programs for the factors most reflective of academic achievement.
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554157/mobile-medical-apps-for-patient-education-a-graded-review-of-available-dermatology-apps
#15
Aisha Masud, Shahram Shafi, Babar K Rao
The utilization of mobile applications (apps) as educational resources for patients highlights the need for an objective method of evaluating the quality of health care-related mobile apps. In this study, a quantified rubric was developed to objectively grade publicly available dermatology mobile apps with the primary focus of patient education. The rubric included 5 criteria thought to be most important in evaluating the adequacy of these apps in relaying health information to patients: educational objectives, content, accuracy, design, and conflict of interest...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554156/molluscum-contagiosum-in-immunocompromised-patients-aids-presenting-as-molluscum-contagiosum-in-a-patient-with-psoriasis-on-biologic-therapy
#16
William S Kaufman, Christine S Ahn, William W Huang
Molluscum contagiosum (MC) is a common, self-limited cutaneous infection in immunocompetent individuals. However, in immunocompromised individuals the infection often has an atypical presentation and can be difficult to eradicate, making both the diagnosis and treatment challenging. Due to advancements in the management of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and cancer, there is a growing population of immunosuppressed individuals, signaling the need for dermatologists to recognize and manage related skin diseases...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554155/melkersson-rosenthal-syndrome-successfully-treated-with-adalimumab
#17
Ellen H de Moll, Mark G Lebwohl
Melkersson-Rosenthal syndrome (MRS) is a rare syndrome of facial nerve palsy, facial edema, and lingua plicata that can be difficult to treat. We observed a patient with MRS of 4 years' duration that was unsuccessfully treated with multiple therapies. After a variety of diagnoses were considered at outside institutions, including Bell palsy, we diagnosed the patient with MRS based on clinical presentation of the classic triad. Treatment with adalimumab, a tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) antibody, showed improvement and relapse-free progress...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29554154/nail-patella-syndrome-clinical-clues-for-making-the-diagnosis
#18
Alexandra Price, Jessica Cervantes, Scott Lindsey, Divya Aickara, Shasa Hu
Nail-patella syndrome (NPS) is a rare autosomal-dominant disorder characterized by the classic triad of fingernail dysplasia, patellar absence/hypoplasia, and presence of iliac horns. We describe the various features of NPS, focusing on dermatologic and musculoskeletal findings. A 69-year-old man presented to the dermatology clinic for a routine skin cancer screening. Physical examination revealed hypoplastic fingernails with longitudinal ridging, splitting, and triangular lunulae; left patellar absence and right patellar hypoplasia; and bilateral iliac horns that had been present since birth...
February 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29529123/tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha-inhibitors-in-the-treatment-of-toxic-epidermal-necrolysis
#19
Katelyn F Woolridge, Patrick L Boler, Brian D Lee
Toxic epidermal necrolysis (TEN) is a rare, life-threatening adverse drug reaction for which there is no standardized or consistently effective treatment. Due to a greater understanding of disease pathogenesis and the identification of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) α as a mediator of keratinocyte death, TNF-α antagonists have been used in the treatment of TEN. Specifically, infliximab and etanercept have been shown to be effective at halting disease progression. The objective of this study is to review published case reports and case series using anti-TNF-α medications in the treatment of TEN...
January 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29529122/what-do-you-want-to-be-when-you-grow-up-pearls-for-postresidency-planning
#20
Ellen H de Moll
Dermatology is an exciting and rewarding specialty. Looking for jobs after training can be a daunting task. From deciding to pursue a fellowship or a job in private practice, the opportunities are extensive. I have collected advice from recent dermatology graduates to help jump-start the planning process.
January 2018: Cutis; Cutaneous Medicine for the Practitioner
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