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Journal of Health Economics

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28073062/effects-of-payment-reform-in-more-versus-less-competitive-markets
#1
Neeraj Sood, Abby Alpert, Kayleigh Barnes, Peter Huckfeldt, José J Escarce
Policymakers are increasingly interested in reducing healthcare costs and inefficiencies through innovative payment strategies. These strategies may have heterogeneous impacts across geographic areas, potentially reducing or exacerbating geographic variation in healthcare spending. In this paper, we exploit a major payment reform for home health care to examine whether reductions in reimbursement lead to differential changes in treatment intensity and provider costs depending on the level of competition in a market...
December 30, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040620/the-long-term-health-impacts-of-medicaid-and-chip
#2
Owen Thompson
This paper estimates the effect of US public health insurance programs for children on health. Previous work in this area has typically focused on the relationship between current program eligibility and current health. But because health is a stock variable which reflects the cumulative influence of health inputs, it would be preferable to estimate the impact of total program eligibility during childhood on longer-term health outcomes. I provide such estimates by using longitudinal data to construct Medicaid and CHIP eligibility measures that are observed from birth through age 18 and estimating the effect of cumulative program exposure on a variety of health outcomes observed in early adulthood...
December 23, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27992772/the-role-of-imperfect-surrogate-endpoint-information-in-drug-approval-and-reimbursement-decisions
#3
Katalin Bognar, John A Romley, Jay P Bae, James Murray, Jacquelyn W Chou, Darius N Lakdawalla
Approval of new drugs is increasingly reliant on "surrogate endpoints," which correlate with but imperfectly predict clinical benefits. Proponents argue surrogate endpoints allow for faster approval, but critics charge they provide inadequate evidence. We develop an economic framework that addresses the value of improvement in the predictive power, or "quality," of surrogate endpoints, and clarifies how quality can influence decisions by regulators, payers, and manufacturers. For example, the framework shows how lower-quality surrogates lead to greater misalignment of incentives between payers and regulators, resulting in more drugs that are approved for use but not covered by payers...
December 11, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28040621/non-separable-time-preferences-novelty-consumption-and-body-weight-theory-and-evidence-from-the-east-german-transition-to-capitalism
#4
Davide Dragone, Nicolas R Ziebarth
This paper develops a dynamic model to illustrate how diet and body weight change when novel food products become available to consumers. We propose a microfounded test to empirically discriminate between habit and taste formation in intertemporal preferences. Moreover, we show that 'novelty consumption' and endogenous preferences can explain the persistent correlation between economic development and obesity. By empirically studying the German reunification, we find that East Germans consumed more novel Western food and gained more weight than West Germans when a larger variety of food products became readily accessible after the fall of the Wall...
December 9, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28012299/claims-shifting-the-problem-of-parallel-reimbursement-regimes
#5
Olesya Fomenko, Jonathan Gruber
Parallel reimbursement regimes, under which providers have some discretion over which payer gets billed for patient treatment, are a common feature of health care markets. In the U.S., the largest such system is under Workers' Compensation (WC), where the treatment workers with injuries that are not definitively tied to a work accident may be billed either under group health insurance plans or under WC. We document that there is significant reclassification of injuries from group health plans into WC, or "claims shifting", when the financial incentives to do so are strongest...
December 9, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27814484/a-soft-pillow-for-hard-times-economic-insecurity-food-intake-and-body-weight-in-russia
#6
Matthias Staudigel
This study investigates causal effects of economic insecurity on subjective anxiety, food intake, and weight outcomes. A review of psychological and nutrition studies highlights the complexity of processes at work on each stage of this causal chain. Econometric analyses trace the effects along the hypothesized pathway using detailed household panel data from the Russia Longitudinal Monitoring Survey from 1994 to 2005. Economic insecurity measures serve as key explanatory variables in regressions and are instrumented by exogenous regional indicators...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27814483/do-working-conditions-at-older-ages-shape-the-health-gradient
#7
Lauren L Schmitz
This study examines whether working conditions at the end of workers' careers impact health and contribute to health disparities across occupations. A dynamic panel correlated random effects model is used in conjunction with a rich data set that combines information from the Health and Retirement Study (HRS), expert ratings of job demands from the Occupational Information Network (O*NET), and mid-career earnings records from the Social Security Administration's (SSA) Master Earnings File (MEF). Results reveal a strong relationship between positive aspects of the psychosocial work environment and improved self-reported health status, blood pressure, and cognitive function...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27792903/doctor-patient-differences-in-risk-and-time-preferences-a-field-experiment
#8
Matteo M Galizzi, Marisa Miraldo, Charitini Stavropoulou, Marjon van der Pol
We conduct a framed field experiment among patients and doctors to test whether the two groups have similar risk and time preferences. We elicit risk and time preferences using multiple price list tests and their adaptations to the healthcare context. Risk and time preferences are compared in terms of switching points in the tests and the structurally estimated behavioural parameters. We find that doctors and patients significantly differ in their time preferences: doctors discount future outcomes less heavily than patients...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27765280/the-design-of-long-term-care-insurance-contracts
#9
Helmuth Cremer, Jean-Marie Lozachmeur, Pierre Pestieau
This paper studies the design of long term care (LTC) insurance contracts in the presence of ex post moral hazard. While this problem bears some similarity with the study of health insurance (Blomqvist, 1997) the significance of informal LTC affects the problem in several crucial ways. It introduces the potential crowding out of informal care by market care financed through insurance coverage. Furthermore, the information structure becomes more intricate. Informal care is not publicly observable and, unlike the insurer, caregivers know the true needs of their relatives...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27744236/does-the-extension-of-primary-care-practice-opening-hours-reduce-the-use-of-emergency-services
#10
Matteo Lippi Bruni, Irene Mammi, Cristina Ugolini
Overcrowding in emergency departments generates potential inefficiencies. Using regional administrative data, we investigate the impact that an increase in the accessibility of primary care has on emergency visits in Italy. We consider two measures of avoidable emergency visits recorded at list level for each General Practitioner. We test whether extending practices' opening hours to up to 12 hours/day reduces the inappropriate utilization of emergency services. Since subscribing to the extension program is voluntary, we account for the potential endogeneity of participation in a count model for emergency admissions in two ways: first, we use a two-stage residual inclusion approach...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27736705/the-mental-health-parity-and-addiction-equity-act-evaluation-study-impact-on-specialty-behavioral-health-utilization-and-expenditures-among-carve-out-enrollees
#11
Susan L Ettner, Jessica M Harwood, Amber Thalmayer, Michael K Ong, Haiyong Xu, Michael J Bresolin, Kenneth B Wells, Chi-Hong Tseng, Francisca Azocar
Interrupted time series with and without controls was used to evaluate whether the federal Mental Health Parity and Addiction Equity Act (MHPAEA) and its Interim Final Rule increased the probability of specialty behavioral health treatment and levels of utilization and expenditures among patients receiving treatment. Linked insurance claims, eligibility, plan and employer data from 2008 to 2013 were used to estimate segmented regression analyses, allowing for level and slope changes during the transition (2010) and post-MHPAEA (2011-2013) periods...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27723470/the-effect-of-college-education-on-mortality
#12
Kasey Buckles, Andreas Hagemann, Ofer Malamud, Melinda Morrill, Abigail Wozniak
We exploit exogenous variation in years of completed college induced by draft-avoidance behavior during the Vietnam War to examine the impact of college on adult mortality. Our estimates imply that increasing college attainment from the level of the state at the 25th percentile of the education distribution to that of the state at the 75th percentile would decrease cumulative mortality for cohorts in our sample by 8 to 10 percent relative to the mean. Most of the reduction in mortality is from deaths due to cancer and heart disease...
September 3, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27697699/the-effect-of-narrow-provider-networks-on-health-care-use
#13
Alicia Atwood, Anthony T Lo Sasso
Network design is an often overlooked aspect of health insurance contracts. Recent policy factors have resulted in narrower provider networks. We provide plausibly causal evidence on the effect of narrow network plans offered by a large national health insurance carrier in a major metropolitan market. Our econometric design exploits the fact that some firms offer a narrow network plan to their employees and some do not. Our results show that narrow network health plans lead to reductions in health care utilization and spending...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27693892/quality-rating-and-private-prices-evidence-from-the-nursing-home-industry
#14
Sean Shenghsiu Huang, Richard A Hirth
We use the rollout of the five-star rating of nursing homes to study how private-pay prices respond to quality rating. We find that star rating increases the price differential between top- and bottom-ranked facilities. On average, prices of top-ranked facilities increased by 4.8 to 6.0 percent more than the prices of bottom-ranked facilities. We find stronger price effects in markets that are less concentrated where consumers may have more choices of alternative nursing homes. Our results suggest that with simplified design and when markets are less concentrated, consumers are more responsive to quality reporting...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27692664/quality-standards-versus-nutritional-taxes-health-and-welfare-impacts-with-strategic-firms
#15
Vincent Réquillart, Louis-Georges Soler, Yu Zang
The goal of this paper is to better understand firms' strategic reactions to nutritional policies targeting food quality improvements and to derive optimal policies. We propose a model of product differentiation, taking into account the taste and health characteristics of products. We study how two firms react to alternative policies: an MQS policy, linear taxation of the two goods on the market, and taxation of the low-quality good. The MQS and the taxation of the low-quality product are the preferred options by a social planner...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27661738/do-hospital-owned-skilled-nursing-facilities-provide-better-post-acute-care-quality
#16
Momotazur Rahman, Edward C Norton, David C Grabowski
As hospitals are increasingly held accountable for patients' post-discharge outcomes under new payment models, hospitals may choose to acquire skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) to better manage these outcomes. This raises the question of whether patients discharged to hospital-based SNFs have better outcomes. In unadjusted comparisons, hospital-based SNF patients have much lower Medicare utilization in the 180 days following discharge relative to freestanding SNF patients. We solved the problem of differential selection into hospital-based and freestanding SNFs by using differential distance from home to the nearest hospital with a SNF relative to the distance from home to the nearest hospital without a SNF as an instrument...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27590088/choice-of-hospital-which-type-of-quality-matters
#17
Nils Gutacker, Luigi Siciliani, Giuseppe Moscelli, Hugh Gravelle
The implications of hospital quality competition depend on what type of quality affects choice of hospital. Previous studies of quality and choice of hospitals have used crude measures of quality such as mortality and readmission rates rather than measures of the health gain from specific treatments. We estimate multinomial logit models of hospital choice by patients undergoing hip replacement surgery in the English NHS to test whether hospital demand responds to quality as measured by detailed patient reports of health before and after hip replacement...
December 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27792902/health-shocks-and-risk-aversion
#18
Simon Decker, Hendrik Schmitz
We empirically assess whether a health shock influences individual risk aversion. We use grip strength data to obtain an objective health shock indicator. In order to account for the non-random nature of our data regression-adjusted matching is employed. Risk preferences are traditionally assumed to be constant. However, we find that a health shock increases individual risk aversion. The finding is robust to a series of sensitivity analyses and persists for at least four years after the shock. Income changes do not seem to be the driving mechanism...
October 8, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27776744/late-stage-pharmaceutical-r-d-and-pricing-policies-under-two-stage-regulation
#19
Sebastian Jobjörnsson, Martin Forster, Paolo Pertile, Carl-Fredrik Burman
We present a model combining the two regulatory stages relevant to the approval of a new health technology: the authorisation of its commercialisation and the insurer's decision about whether to reimburse its cost. We show that the degree of uncertainty concerning the true value of the insurer's maximum willingness to pay for a unit increase in effectiveness has a non-monotonic impact on the optimal price of the innovation, the firm's expected profit and the optimal sample size of the clinical trial. A key result is that there exists a range of values of the uncertainty parameter over which a reduction in uncertainty benefits the firm, the insurer and patients...
October 5, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27745904/editorial-of-special-issue-industrial-organisation-of-the-health-sector-and-public-policy
#20
Martin Chalkley, Helmuth Cremer, Luigi Siciliani
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 30, 2016: Journal of Health Economics
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