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Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257681/the-essential-achilles
#1
EDITORIAL
Paul Dayton
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257680/surgical-correction-of-the-achilles-tendon-for-diabetic-foot-ulcerations-and-charcot-neuroarthropathy
#2
REVIEW
Crystal L Ramanujam, Thomas Zgonis
Achilles tendon pathologic conditions are implicated in contributing to the development of many diabetic foot complications including diabetic foot ulceration and Charcot neuroarthropathy. Surgical correction of the diabetic equinus deformity has been studied as an isolated or adjunctive treatment when dealing with difficult-to-close diabetic foot ulcerations or when surgically addressing the diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy foot or ankle. This article reviews the most common indications, complications, and surgical procedures for equinus correction by either a tendo-Achilles lengthening or gastrocnemius recession for the management of diabetic foot conditions...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257679/repair-of-neglected-achilles-rupture
#3
REVIEW
Bradly W Bussewitz
Acute Achilles tendon ruptures is routinely missed or undertreated, leading to functional deficits. The neglected Achilles ruptures often requires surgical repair to regain functional improvement. The tendon retraction and resultant necessary debridement of the rupture site leads to difficulty completing end-to-end repair. Advanced techniques, including fascial advancements, tendon transfers, and use of allografts, allow the treating surgeon many viable repair options for the neglected Achilles presentation...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257678/acute-achilles-rupture-percutaneous-repair-approach-materials-techniques
#4
REVIEW
Jason George DeVries, Brandon M Scharer, Benjamin J Summerhays
Closed traumatic Achilles tendon rupture is a common injury, especially in the aging athlete. Traditionally open repair has been recognized to offer a lower rerupture rate compared with nonoperative methods but with a higher complication rate. Percutaneous repair has been described to offer the benefits of open repair while avoiding the complications. The sural nerve is potentially susceptible to injury, and specialized instrumentation has been developed to avoid this event. This article discusses several techniques of minimally invasive Achilles tendon repair...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257677/acute-rupture-open-repair-techniques
#5
REVIEW
Robert D Santrock, Andrew J Friedmann, Andrew E Hanselman
Achilles tendon injuries can be serious injuries requiring either operative or nonoperative management. For appropriate surgical candidates, operative intervention may provide lower rerupture rates and adequate end-to-end tendon healing. Our preference is an open Achilles tendon repair, specifically a limited open technique using the PARS device (Arthrex, Naples, FL). Postoperatively, we use functional rehabilitation and early range of motion. Although the current literature remains controversial regarding operative versus nonoperative management, the authors have obtained satisfactory results in appropriately chosen surgical candidates...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257676/acute-achilles-tendon-rupture-clinical-evaluation-conservative-management-and-early-active-rehabilitation
#6
REVIEW
Merrell Kauwe
The Achilles tendon (AT) is the strongest, largest, and most commonly ruptured tendon in the human body. Physical examination provides high sensitivity and specificity. Imaging studies are not recommended unless there are equivocal findings in the physical examination. Recent studies have shown that the risk of re-rupture is negated with implementation of functional rehabilitation protocols. Heterogeneity in study design makes conclusions on the specifics of functional rehabilitation protocols difficult; however, it is clear that early weight bearing and early controlled mobilization lead to better patient outcome and satisfaction in both surgically and conservatively treated populations...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257675/equinus-and-lengthening-techniques
#7
REVIEW
Patrick A DeHeer
Equinus is linked to most lower extremity biomechanically related disorders. Defining equinus as ankle joint dorsiflexion less than 5° of dorsiflexion with the knee extended is the basis for evaluation and management of the deformity. Consistent evaluation methodology using a goniometer with the subtalar joint in neutral position and midtarsal joint supinated while dorsiflexing the ankle with knee extended provides a consistent clinical examination. For equinus deformity with an associated disorder, comprehensive treatment mandates treatment of the equinus deformity...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257674/insertional-achilles-tendinopathy
#8
REVIEW
Gage M Caudell
Posterior heel pain is a common condition of the foot and ankle and is seen in a variety of foot types. Nonoperative treatment methods consisting of shoes inserts, heel lifts, stretching, physical therapy, nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs, eccentric strength training, and other modalities have been shown to have mixed results. When indicated, surgical repair can produce good long-term results. Complications, although uncommon, most commonly result from wound healing complications.
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257673/midsubstance-tendinopathy-surgical-management
#9
REVIEW
William T DeCarbo, Mark J Bullock
Noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy often responds to nonoperative treatment. When nonoperative treatment fails, the clinician must distinguish between paratendinopathy and noninsertional tendinopathy. In paratendinopathy, myofibroblasts synthesize collagen, causing adhesions, and the paratenon may be released or excised. If a core area of tendinopathy is identified on MRI, the area is excised longitudinally and repaired with a side-to-side suture. If greater than 50% of the tendon diameter is excised, the authors recommend a short flexor hallucis longus tendon transfer with an interference screw...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257672/midsubstance-tendinopathy-percutaneous-techniques-platelet-rich-plasma-extracorporeal-shock-wave-therapy-prolotherapy-radiofrequency-ablation
#10
REVIEW
William Bret Smith, Will Melton, James Davies
The focus of this article is to present the current options available for noninvasive and percutaneous treatment options for noninsertional Achilles tendinopathy. An attempt is made to offer recommendations for both the treatment techniques as well as postprocedure protocols to be considered. Additionally, because there are numerous treatment options in this category, the different techniques are summarized in a chart format with a short list of pros and cons as well as the levels of evidence in the literature to support the different modalities...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257671/nonsurgical-management-of-midsubstance-achilles-tendinopathy
#11
REVIEW
Shane McClinton, Lace Luedke, Derek Clewley
Midsubstance Achilles tendinopathy is one of the most common lower leg conditions. Most patients can recover with nonsurgical treatment that focuses on tendon loading exercises and, when necessary, symptom modulating treatments such as topical, oral, or injected medication, ice, shoe inserts, manual therapy, stretching, taping, or low-level laser. If unresponsive to initial management, a small percentage of patients may consider shockwave or sclerosing treatment and possibly surgery.
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257670/noninsertional-achilles-tendinopathy-pathologic-background-and-clinical-examination
#12
REVIEW
Mindi Feilmeier
The term tendinopathy includes a series of pathologies, all of which have a combination of pain, swelling, and impaired performance. The terms tendinosis, tendinitis and peritendinitis are all within the main heading of tendinopathy; this terminology provides a more accurate understanding of the condition and highlights the uniformity of clinical findings while distinguishing the individual histopathological findings of each condition. Understanding the clinical features and the underlying histopathology leads to a more accurate clinical diagnosis and subsequent treatment selection...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257669/imaging-techniques-and-indications
#13
REVIEW
James M Mahoney
This article evaluates the utility of radiography, ultrasonography, and MRI in diagnosing Achilles tendon injuries. It reviews the pertinent anatomy of the Achilles and associated structures, and signs of disorder with each imaging technique. The economics of use ultrasonography and MRI are discussed. They should serve as complementary diagnostic tools, with ultrasonography the first choice because of its ease of use, ability to view dynamic function, and cost. However, clinical examination is often best for diagnosis; MRI and ultrasonography often should be considered only when the diagnosis is confounding or a patient does not respond to recommended conservative care...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28257668/anatomic-vascular-and-mechanical-overview-of-the-achilles-tendon
#14
REVIEW
Paul Dayton
The Achilles tendon is the strongest and thickest tendon in the body and is subjected to unique forces during the activities of living. A variety of pathologic processes have been identified causing clinical symptoms in patients of all ages. A detailed understanding of Achilles anatomy is necessary to understand the pathologic process that are seen in the tendon. As with all medical topics and conditions, our understanding is evolving as new research sheds light on pathologic processes involved with the Achilles tendon...
April 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865320/the-diabetic-charcot-foot-and-ankle-a-multidisciplinary-team-approach
#15
EDITORIAL
Thomas Zgonis
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865319/circular-external-fixation-as-a-primary-or-adjunctive-therapy-for-the-podoplastic-approach-of-the-diabetic-charcot-foot
#16
REVIEW
Daniel J Short, Thomas Zgonis
Numerous techniques have been described for surgical management of the diabetic Charcot foot. External fixation has become a main surgical tool for the reconstructive foot and ankle surgeon when dealing with the ulcerated diabetic Charcot foot. In the presence of an open wound and/or osteomyelitis, staged reconstruction with circular external fixation becomes ideal for salvage of the diabetic lower extremity. Also, circular external fixation can provide simultaneous compression and stabilization, correct the underlying osseous or soft tissue deformities, and surgically offload the diabetic Charcot foot...
January 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865318/medical-imaging-in-differentiating-the-diabetic-charcot-foot-from-osteomyelitis
#17
REVIEW
Daniel J Short, Thomas Zgonis
Diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) poses a great challenge to diagnose in the early stages and when plain radiographs do not depict any initial signs of osseous fragmentation or dislocation in a setting of a high clinical index of suspicion. Medical imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, computed tomography, and advanced bone scintigraphy, has its own unique clinical indications when treating the DCN with or without concomitant osteomyelitis. This article reviews different clinical case scenarios for choosing the most accurate medical imaging in differentiating DCN from osteomyelitis...
January 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865317/revisional-surgery-of-the-diabetic-charcot-foot-and-ankle
#18
REVIEW
Patrick R Burns, Spencer J Monaco
Charcot neuroarthropathy (CN) is a difficult problem for the foot and ankle surgeon. If surgery is required, little is known or available regarding the best methods and timing. When the initial attempt of reconstruction fails, revision of CN is even more demanding. One must take in to account all aspects, including nutrition, vascular status, infection control, short- and long-term blood glucose management, as well as other factors requiring laboratory monitoring and consult services. Once optimized, the biomechanics of the deformity can be addressed and decisions can be made on fixation devices...
January 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865316/soft-tissue-reconstruction-pyramid-for-the-diabetic-charcot-foot
#19
REVIEW
Claire M Capobianco, Thomas Zgonis
Foot and ankle ulcerations in patients with diabetic Charcot neuroarthropathy (DCN) occur frequently and can be challenging to address surgically when conservative care fails. Patients with acute or chronic diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) are at continued risk for development of osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, gas gangrene, and potential lower extremity amputation. Concurrent vasculopathy and peripheral neuropathy as well as uncontrolled medical comorbidities complicate the treatment approach. In addition, pathomechanical forces left untreated may contribute to DFU recurrence in this patient population...
January 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27865315/surgical-treatment-options-for-the-diabetic-charcot-hindfoot-and-ankle-deformity
#20
REVIEW
Tahir Ögüt, Necip Selcuk Yontar
Charcot neuroarthropathy is associated with progressive, noninfectious, osteolysis-induced bone and joint destruction. When the ankle and/or hindfoot is affected by the destruction process, management is further complicated with collapse and destruction of the talar body, which increases instability around the ankle. In this patient population, arthrodesis is the most commonly used surgical procedure. Internal fixation, external fixation, or a combination of both can be used for the treatment. Decision making between them should be individualized according to the patient characteristics...
January 2017: Clinics in Podiatric Medicine and Surgery
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