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Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29319539/patterns-of-disrespectful-physician-behavior-at-an-academic-medical-center-implications-for-training-prevention-and-remediation
#1
Joseph Hopkins, Haley Hedlin, Ann Weinacker, Manisha Desai
PURPOSE: Physician disrespectful behavior affects quality of care, patient safety, and collaborative clinical team function. Evidence defining the demographics, ethnography, and epidemiology of disrespectful behavior is lacking. METHOD: The authors conducted a retrospective analysis of reports of disrespectful physician behavior at Stanford Hospital and Clinics from March 2011 through February 2015. Events were stratified by role, gender, specialty, and location in the hospital or clinics where the event occurred...
January 9, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298183/an-integrated-career-coaching-and-time-banking-system-promoting-flexibility-wellness-and-success-a-pilot-program-at-stanford-university-school-of-medicine
#2
Magali Fassiotto, Caroline Simard, Christy Sandborg, Hannah Valantine, Jennifer Raymond
Faculty in academic medicine experience multiple demands on their time at work and at home, which can become a source of stress and dissatisfaction, compromising success. A taskforce convened to diagnose the state of work-life flexibility at Stanford University School of Medicine uncovered two major sources of conflict for faculty: work-life conflict, caused by juggling demands of career and home, and work-work conflict, caused by competing priorities of the tripartite research, teaching, and clinical mission of an academic medical center combined with service and administrative tasks...
January 2, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298182/the-advocacy-portfolio-a-standardized-tool-for-documenting-physician-advocacy
#3
Abby L Nerlinger, Anita N Shah, Andrew F Beck, Lee S Beers, Shale L Wong, Lisa J Chamberlain, David Keller
Recent changes in health care delivery systems and in medical training have primed academia for a paradigm shift, with strengthened support for an expanded definition of scholarship. Physicians who consider advocacy to be relevant to their scholarly endeavors need a standardized format to display activities and measure the value of health outcomes to which their work can be attributed. Similar to the Educator Portfolio, the authors here propose the Advocacy Portfolio (AP) to document a scholarly approach to advocacy...
January 2, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298181/charting-the-publication-and-citation-impact-of-the-nih-clinical-and-translational-science-awards-ctsa-program-from-2006-through-2016
#4
Nicole Llewellyn, Dorothy R Carter, Latrice Rollins, Eric J Nehl
PURPOSE: The authors evaluated publication and citation patterns for articles supported by Clinical and Translational Science Awards (CTSA) hub investment over the first decade of the CTSA program. The aim was to elucidate a pivotal step in the translational process by providing an account of how time, hub maturity, and hub attributes were related to productivity and influence in the academic literature. METHOD: In early 2017, the authors collected bibliometric data from PubMed, Web of Science InCites, and NIH iCite for articles citing any CTSA hub grants published from hub inception through 2016...
January 2, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29298180/medical-education-videos-for-the-world-an-analysis-of-viewing-patterns-for-a-youtube-channel
#5
Sean Tackett, Kyle Slinn, Tanner Marshall, Shiv Gaglani, Vincent Waldman, Rishi Desai
PURPOSE: Medical education videos can enhance learning and easily integrate into common instructional methods. YouTube permits worldwide access to high-quality medical education videos; however, no studies have described the reach of medical education videos on YouTube or what topics are preferred. METHOD: One year of YouTube analytics data (February 1, 2016, to January 31, 2017) was collected for a medical education-focused channel called Osmosis. Created December 20, 2015, the channel had 189 disease-focused videos by January 2017...
January 2, 2018: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280756/creating-structured-opportunities-for-social-engagement-to-promote-well-being-and-reduce-burnout-in-medical-students-and-residents
#6
Roy C Ziegelstein
Increasing attention is being paid to medical student and resident well-being, as well as to enhancing resilience and avoiding burnout in medical trainees. Medical schools and residency programs are implementing wellness initiatives that often include meditation and other mindfulness activities, self-reflection, journaling, and lectures or workshops on resilience tools such as metacognition and cognitive restructuring. These interventions have in common the creation of opportunities for trainees to become more aware of their experiences, to better recognize stressors, and to regulate their thoughts and feelings so that stressors are less likely to have harmful effects...
December 26, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280755/using-relational-reasoning-strategies-to-help-improve-clinical-reasoning-practice
#7
Denis Dumas, Dario M Torre, Steven J Durning
Clinical reasoning-the steps up to and including establishing a diagnosis and/or therapy-is a fundamentally important mental process for physicians. Unfortunately, mounting evidence suggests that errors in clinical reasoning lead to substantial problems for medical professionals and patients alike, including suboptimal care, malpractice claims, and rising health care costs. For this reason, cognitive strategies by which clinical reasoning may be improved-and that many expert clinicians are already utilizing-are highly relevant for all medical professionals, educators, and learners...
December 26, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280754/fake-it-til-you-make-it-pressures-to-measure-up-in-surgical-training
#8
Priyanka Patel, Maria A Martimianakis, Nathan R Zilbert, Carween Mui, Melanie Hammond Mobilio, Simon Kitto, Carol-Anne Moulton
PURPOSE: Expectations of certainty and confidence in surgical culture are a source of internal conflict for surgeons and learners, with surgeons describing a pressure to project an image that is, at times, inconsistent with how they feel internally. The authors explored surgical residents' perceptions of "impression management" and its effects on surgical judgment and decision-making. METHOD: The authors used a constructivist grounded theory approach to conduct and analyze 15 semi-structured interviews with general surgery trainees at an urban Canadian academic health center between 2012-2014...
December 26, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280753/postexamination-analysis-the-item-characteristic-curve
#9
Mohsen Tavakol, Reg Dennick
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 26, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29280752/medical-graduates-truthful-and-useful-analytics-with-big-data-and-the-art-of-persuasion
#10
Des Gorman, T Michael Kashner
The authors propose that the provision of state-of-the-art, effective, safe, and affordable health care requires medical school graduates not only to be competent practitioners and scientists, but also to be policy makers and professional leaders. To meet this challenge in the era of big data and cloud computing, these graduates must be able to understand and critically interpret analyses of large, observational datasets from electronic health records, third party claims files, surveys, and epidemiologic health datasets...
December 26, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261541/the-medical-school-admissions-process-and-meeting-the-public-s-health-care-needs-never-the-twain-shall-meet
#11
Jennifer Cleland
Medical schools typically assess how good their selection process is using metrics such as students' assessment performance and the academic success of alumni on later indicators of academic ability and clinical competence, such as Royal College of Physicians or specialty board examinations. To address global issues with the maldistribution of doctors and increasing numbers of new medical school graduates choosing not to work in a clinical context requires different measurements of medical school admissions processes, like those related to graduates' career outcomes (e...
December 19, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261540/looking-back-to-move-forward-first-year-medical-students-meta-reflections-on-their-narrative-portfolio-writings
#12
Hetty Cunningham, Delphine Taylor, Urmi A Desai, Samuel C Quiah, Benjamin Kaplan, Lorraine Fei, Marina Catallozzi, Boyd Richards, Dorene F Balmer, Rita Charon
The day-to-day rigors of medical education often preclude learners from gaining a longitudinal perspective on who they are becoming. Furthermore, the current focus on competencies, coupled with concerning rates of trainee burnout and a decline in empathy, have fueled the search for pedagogic tools to foster students' reflective capacity. In response, many scholars have looked to the tradition of narrative medicine to foster "reflective spaces" wherein holistic professional identity construction can be supported...
December 19, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261539/the-aspire-to-excellence-program-a-global-effort-to-improve-the-quality-of-medical-education
#13
Dan Hunt, Debra Klamen, Ronald M Harden, Farzand Ali
Publications and organizations ranking medical schools rely heavily on schools' research-oriented and grant-success data because those are the publicly available data. To address the vacuum of evidence for medical education quality, in 2012 the Association of Education in Europe (AMEE) introduced an initiative entitled A Schools Programme for International Recognition of Excellence in Education (ASPIRE) awards. ASPIRE panels of international experts in specific areas of medical education have developed internationally peer-based criteria to benchmark excellence in social accountability, student engagement, student assessment, faculty development, and simulation; they plan to publish criteria on curriculum design and development in 2018...
December 19, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29261538/the-current-use-of-united-states-medical-licensing-examination-step-1-scores-holistic-admissions-and-student-well-being-are-in-the-balance
#14
Kevin F Moynahan
United States Medical Licensing Examination Step 1 scores increasingly are being used by graduate medical education programs to "screen out" applicants to invite for an interview; medical students with scores below a certain (usually unpublished) point are not considered for an interview. Conversely, many students are extended an interview invitation based solely on their Step 1 scores, prior to the release of their Medical Student Performance Evaluation. In this Invited Commentary, the author discusses why this practice has gained popularity as well as the unintended effects it has had in multiple domains--holistic undergraduate medical education admissions practices, student well-being, and medical school curricula...
December 19, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239903/proposed-performance-based-metrics-for-the-future-funding-of-graduate-medical-education-starting-the-conversation
#15
Kelly J Caverzagie, Susan W Lane, Niraj Sharma, John Donnelly, Jeffrey R Jaeger, Heather Laird-Fick, John P Moriarty, Darilyn V Moyer, Sara L Wallach, Richard M Wardrop, Alwin F Steinmann
Graduate medical education (GME) in the United States is financed by contributions from both federal and state entities that total over $15 billion annually. Within institutions, these funds are distributed with limited transparency to achieve ill-defined outcomes. To address this, the Institute of Medicine convened a committee on the governance and financing of GME to recommend finance reform that would promote a physician training system that meets society's current and future needs. The resulting report provided several recommendations regarding the oversight and mechanisms of GME funding, including implementation of performance-based GME payments, but did not provide specific details about the content and development of metrics for these payments...
December 12, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29239902/oath-taking-at-u-s-and-canadian-medical-school-ceremonies-historical-perspectives-current-practices-and-future-considerations
#16
Steven J Scheinman, Patrick Fleming, Kellyann Niotis
The widespread use of oaths at medical commencements is a recent phenomenon of the late 20th century. While many are referred to as "Hippocratic," surveys have found that most oaths are modern, and the use of unique oaths has been rising. Oaths taken upon entry to medical school are even more recent, and their content has not been reported. The authors surveyed all Association of American Medical Colleges member schools in the United States and Canada in 2015 and analyzed oath texts. Of 111 (70.2%) responses, full texts were submitted for 80 commencement and 72 white coat oaths...
December 12, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215378/developing-resident-sensitive-quality-measures-a-model-from-pediatric-emergency-medicine
#17
Daniel J Schumacher, Eric S Holmboe, Cees van der Vleuten, Jamiu O Busari, Carol Carraccio
PURPOSE: To begin closing the gap with respect to quality measures available for use among residents, the authors sought to identify and develop resident-sensitive quality measures (RSQMs) for use in the pediatric emergency department (PED) setting. METHOD: In May 2016, the authors reviewed National Quality Measures Clearinghouse (NQMC) measures to identify resident-sensitive measures. To create additional measures focused on common, acute illnesses (acute asthma exacerbation, bronchiolitis, closed head injury [CHI]) in the PED, the authors used a nominal group technique (NGT) and Delphi process from September to December 2016...
December 5, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215377/six-strategies-for-effective-learning
#18
Megan A Sumeracki, Yana Weinstein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
December 5, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215376/why-open-ended-survey-questions-are-unlikely-to-support-rigorous-qualitative-insights
#19
Kori A LaDonna, Taryn Taylor, Lorelei Lingard
Health professions education researchers are increasingly relying on a combination of quantitative and qualitative research methods to explore complex questions in the field. This important and necessary development, however, creates new methodological challenges that can affect both the rigor of the research process and the quality of the findings. One example is "qualitatively" analyzing free-text responses to survey or assessment instrument questions. In this Invited Commentary, the authors explain why analysis of such responses rarely meets the bar for rigorous qualitative research...
December 5, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29215375/pushing-critical-thinking-skills-with-multiple-choice-questions-does-bloom-s-taxonomy-work
#20
Nikki L Bibler Zaidi, Karri L Grob, Seetha M Monrad, Joshua B Kurtz, Andrew Tai, Asra Z Ahmed, Larry D Gruppen, Sally A Santen
Medical school assessments should foster the development of higher-order thinking skills to support clinical reasoning and a solid foundation of knowledge. Multiple-choice questions (MCQs) are commonly used to assess student learning, and well-written MCQs can support learner engagement in higher levels of cognitive reasoning such as application or synthesis of knowledge. Bloom's taxonomy has been used to identify MCQs that assess students' critical thinking skills, with evidence suggesting that higher-order MCQs support a deeper conceptual understanding of scientific process skills...
December 5, 2017: Academic Medicine: Journal of the Association of American Medical Colleges
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