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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077878/pla2g16-represents-a-switch-between-entry-and-clearance-of-picornaviridae
#1
Jacqueline Staring, Eleonore von Castelmur, Vincent A Blomen, Lisa G van den Hengel, Markus Brockmann, Jim Baggen, Hendrik Jan Thibaut, Joppe Nieuwenhuis, Hans Janssen, Frank J M van Kuppeveld, Anastassis Perrakis, Jan E Carette, Thijn R Brummelkamp
Picornaviruses are a leading cause of human and veterinary infections that result in various diseases, including polio and the common cold. As archetypical non-enveloped viruses, their biology has been extensively studied. Although a range of different cell-surface receptors are bound by different picornaviruses, it is unclear whether common host factors are needed for them to reach the cytoplasm. Using genome-wide haploid genetic screens, here we identify the lipid-modifying enzyme PLA2G16 (refs 8, 9, 10, 11) as a picornavirus host factor that is required for a previously unknown event in the viral life cycle...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077877/integration-of-temporal-and-spatial-patterning-generates-neural-diversity
#2
Ted Erclik, Xin Li, Maximilien Courgeon, Claire Bertet, Zhenqing Chen, Ryan Baumert, June Ng, Clara Koo, Urfa Arain, Rudy Behnia, Alberto Del Valle Rodriguez, Lionel Senderowicz, Nicolas Negre, Kevin P White, Claude Desplan
In the Drosophila optic lobes, 800 retinotopically organized columns in the medulla act as functional units for processing visual information. The medulla contains over 80 types of neuron, which belong to two classes: uni-columnar neurons have a stoichiometry of one per column, while multi-columnar neurons contact multiple columns. Here we show that combinatorial inputs from temporal and spatial axes generate this neuronal diversity: all neuroblasts switch fates over time to produce different neurons; the neuroepithelium that generates neuroblasts is also subdivided into six compartments by the expression of specific factors...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077876/microenvironmental-autophagy-promotes-tumour-growth
#3
Nadja S Katheder, Rojyar Khezri, Fergal O'Farrell, Sebastian W Schultz, Ashish Jain, Mohammed M Rahman, Kay O Schink, Theodossis A Theodossiou, Terje Johansen, Gábor Juhász, David Bilder, Andreas Brech, Harald Stenmark, Tor Erik Rusten
As malignant tumours develop, they interact intimately with their microenvironment and can activate autophagy, a catabolic process which provides nutrients during starvation. How tumours regulate autophagy in vivo and whether autophagy affects tumour growth is controversial. Here we demonstrate, using a well characterized Drosophila melanogaster malignant tumour model, that non-cell-autonomous autophagy is induced both in the tumour microenvironment and systemically in distant tissues. Tumour growth can be pharmacologically restrained using autophagy inhibitors, and early-stage tumour growth and invasion are genetically dependent on autophagy within the local tumour microenvironment...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077875/structural-basis-of-co-translational-quality-control-by-arfa-and-rf2-bound-to-ribosome
#4
Fuxing Zeng, Yanbo Chen, Jonathan Remis, Mrinal Shekhar, James C Phillips, Emad Tajkhorshid, Hong Jin
Quality control mechanisms intervene appropriately when defective translation events occur, in order to preserve the integrity of protein synthesis. Rescue of ribosomes translating on messenger RNAs that lack stop codons is one of the co-translational quality control pathways. In many bacteria, ArfA recognizes stalled ribosomes and recruits the release factor RF2, which catalyses the termination of protein synthesis. Although an induced-fit mechanism of nonstop mRNA surveillance mediated by ArfA and RF2 has been reported, the molecular interaction between ArfA and RF2 in the ribosome that is responsible for the mechanism is unknown...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077874/asgard-archaea-illuminate-the-origin-of-eukaryotic-cellular-complexity
#5
Katarzyna Zaremba-Niedzwiedzka, Eva F Caceres, Jimmy H Saw, Disa Bäckström, Lina Juzokaite, Emmelien Vancaester, Kiley W Seitz, Karthik Anantharaman, Piotr Starnawski, Kasper U Kjeldsen, Matthew B Stott, Takuro Nunoura, Jillian F Banfield, Andreas Schramm, Brett J Baker, Anja Spang, Thijs J G Ettema
The origin and cellular complexity of eukaryotes represent a major enigma in biology. Current data support scenarios in which an archaeal host cell and an alphaproteobacterial (mitochondrial) endosymbiont merged together, resulting in the first eukaryotic cell. The host cell is related to Lokiarchaeota, an archaeal phylum with many eukaryotic features. The emergence of the structural complexity that characterizes eukaryotic cells remains unclear. Here we describe the 'Asgard' superphylum, a group of uncultivated archaea that, as well as Lokiarchaeota, includes Thor-, Odin- and Heimdallarchaeota...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077873/translation-from-unconventional-5-start-sites-drives-tumour-initiation
#6
Ataman Sendoel, Joshua G Dunn, Edwin H Rodriguez, Shruti Naik, Nicholas C Gomez, Brian Hurwitz, John Levorse, Brian D Dill, Daniel Schramek, Henrik Molina, Jonathan S Weissman, Elaine Fuchs
We are just beginning to understand how translational control affects tumour initiation and malignancy. Here we use an epidermis-specific, in vivo ribosome profiling strategy to investigate the translational landscape during the transition from normal homeostasis to malignancy. Using a mouse model of inducible SOX2, which is broadly expressed in oncogenic RAS-associated cancers, we show that despite widespread reductions in translation and protein synthesis, certain oncogenic mRNAs are spared. During tumour initiation, the translational apparatus is redirected towards unconventional upstream initiation sites, enhancing the translational efficiency of oncogenic mRNAs...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077872/structural-basis-for-nutrient-acquisition-by-dominant-members-of-the-human-gut-microbiota
#7
Amy J Glenwright, Karunakar R Pothula, Satya P Bhamidimarri, Dror S Chorev, Arnaud Baslé, Susan J Firbank, Hongjun Zheng, Carol V Robinson, Mathias Winterhalter, Ulrich Kleinekathöfer, David N Bolam, Bert van den Berg
The human large intestine is populated by a high density of microorganisms, collectively termed the colonic microbiota, which has an important role in human health and nutrition. The survival of microbiota members from the dominant Gram-negative phylum Bacteroidetes depends on their ability to degrade dietary glycans that cannot be metabolized by the host. The genes encoding proteins involved in the degradation of specific glycans are organized into co-regulated polysaccharide utilization loci, with the archetypal locus sus (for starch utilisation system) encoding seven proteins, SusA-SusG...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077871/hyoliths-are-palaeozoic-lophophorates
#8
Joseph Moysiuk, Martin R Smith, Jean-Bernard Caron
Hyoliths are abundant and globally distributed 'shelly' fossils that appear early in the Cambrian period and can be found throughout the 280 million year span of Palaeozoic strata. The ecological and evolutionary importance of this group has remained unresolved, largely because of their poorly constrained soft anatomy and idiosyncratic scleritome, which comprises an operculum, a conical shell and, in some taxa, a pair of lateral spines (helens). Since their first description over 175 years ago, hyoliths have most often been regarded as incertae sedis, related to molluscs or assigned to their own phylum...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077870/the-role-of-interfacial-lipids-in-stabilizing-membrane-protein-oligomers
#9
Kallol Gupta, Joseph A C Donlan, Jonathan T S Hopper, Povilas Uzdavinys, Michael Landreh, Weston B Struwe, David Drew, Andrew J Baldwin, Phillip J Stansfeld, Carol V Robinson
Oligomerization of membrane proteins in response to lipid binding has a critical role in many cell-signalling pathways but is often difficult to define or predict. Here we report the development of a mass spectrometry platform to determine simultaneously the presence of interfacial lipids and oligomeric stability and to uncover how lipids act as key regulators of membrane-protein association. Evaluation of oligomeric strength for a dataset of 125 α-helical oligomeric membrane proteins reveals an absence of interfacial lipids in the mass spectra of 12 membrane proteins with high oligomeric stability...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28077869/age-extent-and-carbon-storage-of-the-central-congo-basin-peatland-complex
#10
Greta C Dargie, Simon L Lewis, Ian T Lawson, Edward T A Mitchard, Susan E Page, Yannick E Bocko, Suspense A Ifo
Peatlands are carbon-rich ecosystems that cover just three per cent of Earth's land surface, but store one-third of soil carbon. Peat soils are formed by the build-up of partially decomposed organic matter under waterlogged anoxic conditions. Most peat is found in cool climatic regions where unimpeded decomposition is slower, but deposits are also found under some tropical swamp forests. Here we present field measurements from one of the world's most extensive regions of swamp forest, the Cuvette Centrale depression in the central Congo Basin...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076346/cryo-em-structure-of-a-human-spliceosome-activated-for-step-2-of-splicing
#11
Karl Bertram, Dmitry E Agafonov, Wen-Ti Liu, Olexandr Dybkov, Cindy L Will, Klaus Hartmuth, Henning Urlaub, Berthold Kastner, Holger Stark, Reinhard Lu Hrmann
Spliceosome rearrangements facilitated by RNA helicase Prp16 before catalytic step 2 of splicing are poorly understood. Here we report a 3D cryo-electron microscopy structure of the human spliceosomal C complex stalled directly after Prp16 action (C*). The architecture of the catalytic U2-U6 RNP core of the human C* spliceosome is highly similar to that of the yeast pre-Prp16 C complex. However, in C* the branched intron region is separated (by ~20 Å) from the catalytic centre, and its position close to the U6 snRNA ACAGA box is stabilised by interactions with the Prp8 RNase H-like and Prp17 WD40 domains...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28076345/structure-of-a-spliceosome-remodelled-for-exon-ligation
#12
Sebastian M Fica, Chris Oubridge, Wojciech P Galej, Max E Wilkinson, Xiao-Chen Bai, Andrew J Newman, Kiyoshi Nagai
The spliceosome excises introns from pre-mRNAs in two sequential trans-esterifications - branching and exon ligation(1) - catalysed at a single catalytic metal site in U6 snRNA(2,3). The recent structures of the spliceosomal C complex(4,5) with the cleaved 5'-exon and lariat-3'-exon bound to the catalytic centre revealed that branching-specific factors such as Cwc25 lock the branch helix into position for nucleophilic attack of the branch adenosine at the 5'-splice site. Furthermore, the ATPase Prp16 is positioned to bind and translocate the intron downstream of the branch point to destabilize branching-specific factors and release the branch helix from the active site(4)...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068671/high-spatial-resolution-mapping-of-catalytic-reactions-on-single-particles
#13
Chung-Yeh Wu, William J Wolf, Yehonatan Levartovsky, Hans A Bechtel, Michael C Martin, F Dean Toste, Elad Gross
The critical role in surface reactions and heterogeneous catalysis of metal atoms with low coordination numbers, such as found at atomic steps and surface defects, is firmly established. But despite the growing availability of tools that enable detailed in situ characterization, so far it has not been possible to document this role directly. Surface properties can be mapped with high spatial resolution, and catalytic conversion can be tracked with a clear chemical signature; however, the combination of the two, which would enable high-spatial-resolution detection of reactions on catalytic surfaces, has rarely been achieved...
January 11, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068672/genomic-hallmarks-of-localized-non-indolent-prostate-cancer
#14
Michael Fraser, Veronica Y Sabelnykova, Takafumi N Yamaguchi, Lawrence E Heisler, Julie Livingstone, Vincent Huang, Yu-Jia Shiah, Fouad Yousif, Xihui Lin, Andre P Masella, Natalie S Fox, Michael Xie, Stephenie D Prokopec, Alejandro Berlin, Emilie Lalonde, Musaddeque Ahmed, Dominique Trudel, Xuemei Luo, Timothy A Beck, Alice Meng, Junyan Zhang, Alister D'Costa, Robert E Denroche, Haiying Kong, Shadrielle Melijah G Espiritu, Melvin L K Chua, Ada Wong, Taryne Chong, Michelle Sam, Jeremy Johns, Lee Timms, Nicholas B Buchner, Michèle Orain, Valérie Picard, Helène Hovington, Alexander Murison, Ken Kron, Nicholas J Harding, Christine P'ng, Kathleen E Houlahan, Kenneth C Chu, Bryan Lo, Francis Nguyen, Constance H Li, Ren X Sun, Richard de Borja, Christopher I Cooper, Julia F Hopkins, Shaylan K Govind, Clement Fung, Daryl Waggott, Jeffrey Green, Syed Haider, Michelle A Chan-Seng-Yue, Esther Jung, Zhiyuan Wang, Alain Bergeron, Alan Dal Pra, Louis Lacombe, Colin C Collins, Cenk Sahinalp, Mathieu Lupien, Neil E Fleshner, Housheng H He, Yves Fradet, Bernard Tetu, Theodorus van der Kwast, John D McPherson, Robert G Bristow, Paul C Boutros
Prostate tumours are highly variable in their response to therapies, but clinically available prognostic factors can explain only a fraction of this heterogeneity. Here we analysed 200 whole-genome sequences and 277 additional whole-exome sequences from localized, non-indolent prostate tumours with similar clinical risk profiles, and carried out RNA and methylation analyses in a subset. These tumours had a paucity of clinically actionable single nucleotide variants, unlike those seen in metastatic disease. Rather, a significant proportion of tumours harboured recurrent non-coding aberrations, large-scale genomic rearrangements, and alterations in which an inversion repressed transcription within its boundaries...
January 9, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068670/human-behaviour-shoppers-like-what-they-know
#15
Peter M Todd
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 9, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068669/kinetically-e-selective-macrocyclic-ring-closing-metathesis
#16
Xiao Shen, Thach T Nguyen, Ming Joo Koh, Dongmin Xu, Alexander W H Speed, Richard R Schrock, Amir H Hoveyda
Macrocyclic compounds are central to the development of new drugs, but preparing them can be challenging because of the energy barrier that must be surmounted in order to bring together and fuse the two ends of an acyclic precursor such as an alkene (also known as an olefin). To this end, the catalytic process known as ring-closing metathesis (RCM) has allowed access to countless biologically active macrocyclic organic molecules, even for large-scale production. Stereoselectivity is often critical in such cases: the potency of a macrocyclic compound can depend on the stereochemistry of its alkene; alternatively, one isomer of the compound can be subjected to stereoselective modification (such as dihydroxylation)...
January 9, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068668/the-hippo-kinases-lats1-and-2-control-human-breast-cell-fate-via-crosstalk-with-er%C3%AE
#17
Adrian Britschgi, Stephan Duss, Sungeun Kim, Joana Pinto Couto, Heike Brinkhaus, Shany Koren, Duvini De Silva, Kirsten D Mertz, Daniela Kaup, Zsuzsanna Varga, Hans Voshol, Alexandra Vissieres, Cedric Leroy, Tim Roloff, Michael B Stadler, Christina H Scheel, Loren J Miraglia, Anthony P Orth, Ghislain M C Bonamy, Venkateshwar A Reddy, Mohamed Bentires-Alj
Cell fate perturbations underlie many human diseases, including breast cancer. Unfortunately, the mechanisms by which breast cell fate are regulated are largely unknown. The mammary gland epithelium consists of differentiated luminal epithelial and basal myoepithelial cells, as well as undifferentiated stem cells and more restricted progenitors. Breast cancer originates from this epithelium, but the molecular mechanisms that underlie breast epithelial hierarchy remain ill-defined. Here, we use a high-content confocal image-based short hairpin RNA screen to identify tumour suppressors that regulate breast cell fate in primary human breast epithelial cells...
January 9, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28068667/breeding-site-sampling-across-the-arctic-by-individual-males-of-a-polygynous-shorebird
#18
Bart Kempenaers, Mihai Valcu
Males of many polygynous species compete for access to fertile females without providing them with resources other than sperm and without investing in care for the offspring (male dominance polygyny). In such systems, local competition for access to females is intense and typically only a few males obtain matings, leading to strong sexual selection. Sampling multiple breeding areas could then provide a mechanism for males to increase their chances to reproduce. However, little is known about such sampling behaviour and about the spatial scale at which males compete...
January 9, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052062/biological-techniques-stomach-growth-in-a-dish
#19
José B Sáenz, Jason C Mills
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 4, 2017: Nature
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28052061/integrated-genomic-characterization-of-oesophageal-carcinoma
#20
(no author information available yet)
Oesophageal cancers are prominent worldwide; however, there are few targeted therapies and survival rates for these cancers remain dismal. Here we performed a comprehensive molecular analysis of 164 carcinomas of the oesophagus derived from Western and Eastern populations. Beyond known histopathological and epidemiologic distinctions, molecular features differentiated oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas from oesophageal adenocarcinomas. Oesophageal squamous cell carcinomas resembled squamous carcinomas of other organs more than they did oesophageal adenocarcinomas...
January 4, 2017: Nature
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