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Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28927764/how-to-value-patient-values-cesarean-sections-for-the-periviable-fetus-and-home-births
#1
REVIEW
Howard Minkoff, Fouad Atallah
Respect for patient autonomy involves providing sufficient information to patients to allow them to make informed decisions, and then honoring their requests unless they are unethical or futile. At times, the factors that patients consider may not be purely biologic ones but rather will include "spiritual" factors (a sense of control in a home birth). When patients balance biologic risks against spiritual gain, physicians may not be comfortable giving deference to patients' choice. In order to explicate this issue we explore two clinical scenarios: home birth, and cesarean section for a periviable fetus; and we consider futility and limits on affirmative autonomy...
September 15, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28917833/values-based-shared-decision-making-in-the-antenatal-period
#2
REVIEW
Stephanie K Kukora, Renee D Boss
Despite advances in life-saving technology for critically ill neonates, challenges continue to arise for infants delivered with extreme prematurity, congenital anomalies, and genetic conditions that exceed the limits of currently available interventions. In these situations, parents are forced to make cognitively and emotionally difficult decisions, in discussion with a neonatologist, regarding how aggressively to provide supportive measures at the time of delivery and at what point burdens of therapy outweigh benefits...
September 13, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28916237/ethics-and-palliative-care-in-the-perinatal-world
#3
REVIEW
Colleen M Marty, Brian S Carter
The perinatal world is unique in its dutiful consideration of two patients along the lines of decision-making and clinical management - the fetus and the pregnant woman. The potentiality of the fetus-newborn is intertwined with the absolute considerations for the woman as autonomous patient. From prenatal diagnostics, which may be quite extensive, to potential interventions prenatally, postnatal resuscitation, and neonatal management, the fetus and newborn may be anticipated to survive with or without special needs and technology, to have a questionable or guarded prognosis, or to live only minutes to hours...
September 13, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28867155/the-boundaries-of-fetal-cardiac-intervention-expand-or-tighten
#4
REVIEW
Laura Gellis, Wayne Tworetzky
Fetal cardiac intervention (FCI) is a relatively new and continually evolving field, and, for select cardiac defects, offers the potential to alter the progression of the disease and improve outcomes. It is a procedure that requires a collaborative effort between maternal-fetal medicine, interventional cardiology and fetal echo/ultrasound specialists, as well as fetal and maternal anesthesiologists, nursing specialists, and social workers. This article reviews the most recently reported data and advances in FCI...
August 31, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28709949/pulmonary-hypoplasia
#5
REVIEW
C Michael Cotten
To survive the transition to extrauterine life, newborn infants must have lungs that provide an adequate surface area and volume to allow for gas exchange. The dynamic activities of fetal breathing movements and accumulation of lung luminal fluid are key to fetal lung development throughout the various phases of lung development and growth, first by branching morphogenesis, and later by septation. Because effective gas exchange is essential to survival, pulmonary hypoplasia is among the leading findings on autopsies of children dying in the newborn period...
July 11, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28669541/carrier-screening-for-single-gene-disorders
#6
REVIEW
Nancy C Rose, Myra Wick
Screening for genetic disorders began in 1963 with the initiation of newborn screening for phenylketonuria. Advances in molecular technology have made both newborn screening for newborns affected with serious disorders, and carrier screening of individuals at risk for offspring with genetic disorders, more complex and more widely available. Carrier screening today can be performed secondary to family history-based screening, ethnic-based screening, and expanded carrier screening (ECS). ECS is panel-based screening, which analyzes carrier status for hundreds of genetic disorders irrespective of patient race or ethnicity...
June 29, 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28818610/surfactant-and-continuous-positive-airway-pressure-for-the-prevention-of-chronic-lung-disease-history-reality-and-new-challenges
#7
REVIEW
Hany Aly, Mohamed A Mohamed, Jen-Tien Wung
The discovery of surfactant was one of the most significant research events to occur in the history of neonatology. Certainly, surfactant saved lives for premature infants who were otherwise considered non-viable. However, the prevention of chronic lung disease did not progress and it became clear that a significant portion of the help surfactant provides to the premature lung is counteracted by mechanical ventilation. A dilemma exists over the priorities in premature management to intubate and administer surfactant or not to intubate and support these infants non-invasively with the use of continuous positive airway pressure...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28811085/the-use-of-phenobarbital-and-other-anti-seizure-drugs-in-newborns
#8
REVIEW
Mohamed El-Dib, Janet S Soul
Neonatal seizures constitute the most frequent presenting neurologic sign encountered in the neonatal intensive care unit. Despite limited efficacy and safety data, phenobarbital continues to be used near-universally as the first-line anti-seizure drug (ASD) in neonates. The choice of second-line ASDs varies by provider and institution, and is still not supported by sufficient scientific evidence. In this review, we discuss the available evidence supporting the efficacy, mechanism of action, potential adverse effects, key pharmacokinetic characteristics such as interaction with therapeutic hypothermia, logistical issues, and rationale for use of neonatal ASDs...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807545/bronchopulmonary-dysplasia-myths-of-pharmacologic-management
#9
REVIEW
Steven M Donn
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the leading cause of long-term respiratory morbidity in newborns who require respiratory support at birth. BPD is a multifactorial disorder, and infants are frequently subjected to treatment with multiple pharmacologic agents of dubious efficacy and questionable safety, including diuretics, bronchodilators, corticosteroids, anti-reflux medications, and pulmonary vasodilators. These agents, with narrow therapeutic indices, are widely used despite the lack of an evidence base, and some may do more harm than good...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28807544/use-and-misuse-of-drugs-in-perinatology-and-neonatology
#10
EDITORIAL
Hany Aly
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28801177/uses-and-misuses-of-sodium-bicarbonate-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit
#11
Amélie Collins, Rakesh Sahni
Over the past several decades, bicarbonate therapy continues to be used routinely in the treatment of acute metabolic acidosis in critically ill neonates despite the lack of evidence for its effectiveness in the treatment of acid-base imbalance, and evidence indicating that it may be detrimental. Clinicians often feel compelled to use bicarbonate since acidosis implies a need for such therapy and thus the justification for its use is based on hearsay rather than science. This review summarizes the evidence and refutes the clinical practice of administering sodium bicarbonate to treat metabolic acidosis associated with several specific clinical syndromes in neonates...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28801176/caffeine-use-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit
#12
REVIEW
Jalal M Abu-Shaweesh, Richard J Martin
Caffeine is the most frequently used medication in the neonatal intensive care unit. It is used for the prevention and treatment of apnea, although this has been associated with lower incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) and patent ductus arteriosus as well as intact survival at 18-21 months of life. Although neurodevelopmental advantage was no longer statistically significant at age 5 years, caffeine was associated with sustained improvement in co-ordination and less gross motor impairment than placebo...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28768578/the-use-of-inhaled-corticosteroids-in-chronically-ventilated-preterm-infants
#13
REVIEW
Leif D Nelin, J Wells Logan
Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is the most usual reason for preterm infants to require chronic mechanical ventilation. Inflammation is a key factor underlying the lung injury leading to the development of BPD, and the rationale for use of corticosteroids in the management of ventilator-dependent preterm infants is based on their anti-inflammatory effects. Because systemic corticosteroids are associated with significant adverse effects in preterm infants, attention has turned to the use of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) as a potentially safer therapy for BPD...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28739260/uses-and-misuses-of-albumin-during-resuscitation-and-in-the-neonatal-intensive-care-unit
#14
REVIEW
Wissam Shalish, Francois Olivier, Hany Aly, Guilherme Sant'Anna
Albumin is one of the most abundant proteins in plasma and serves many vital functions. Neonatal concentrations vary greatly with gestational and postnatal age. In critically ill neonates, hypoalbuminemia occurs due to decreased synthesis, increased losses or redistribution of albumin into the extravascular space, and has been associated with increased morbidities and mortality. For that reason, infusion of exogenous albumin as a volume expander has been proposed for various clinical settings including hypotension, delivery room resuscitation, sepsis and postoperative fluid management...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28735809/antibiotic-stewardship-in-perinatal-and-neonatal-care
#15
REVIEW
Jayashree Ramasethu, Tetsuya Kawakita
The spread of antibiotic resistance due to the use and misuse of antibiotics around the world is now a major health crisis. Neonates are exposed to antibiotics both before and after birth, often empirically because of risk factors for infection, or for non-specific signs which may or may not indicate sepsis. There is increasing evidence that, apart from antibiotic resistance, the use of antibiotics in pregnancy and in the neonatal period alters the microbiome in the fetus and neonate with an increased risk of immediate and long-term adverse effects...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734732/perinatal-and-neonatal-use-of-sedation-and-analgesia
#16
REVIEW
Christopher McPherson, Terrie Inder
Optimal obstetric and neonatal care requires the provision of adequate analgesia for painful procedures. However, anesthetic and analgesic agents have the potential to adversely impact the developing fetal/neonatal brain. In this setting, clinicians must assess the risks and benefits of pharmacologic anesthesia and analgesia for specific indications in this population. General anesthesia is required for non-obstetric surgery and cesarean section in the absence of neuraxial anesthesia for the health of the mother and fetus...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28734731/postnatal-corticosteroids-to-prevent-or-treat-bronchopulmonary-dysplasia-who-might-benefit
#17
REVIEW
Lex W Doyle, Jeanie L Y Cheong
Newborn infants born very preterm are at high risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia, which is associated with not only mortality but also adverse long-term neurological and respiratory outcomes in survivors. Postnatal corticosteroids might reduce the risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia, or reduce its severity. However, it is important to minimize exposure to the potentially harmful effects of corticosteroids, particularly on the developing brain. Systemic corticosteroids started after the first week of life have shown the most benefit in infants at highest risk of developing bronchopulmonary dysplasia, whereas inhaled corticosteroids have little effect in children with established lung disease...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28724506/the-use-of-non-steroidal-anti-inflammatory-drugs-for-patent-ductus-arteriosus-closure-in-preterm-infants
#18
REVIEW
William E Benitz, Shazia Bhombal
Over the last four decades, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs have been widely used to induce closure of the patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants. Evidence to support this practice is lacking, despite performance of >50 randomized trials. The credibility of those trials may have been compromised by high rates of open treatment in controls, era of study prior to advent of modern practices, or inclusion of insufficient numbers of very immature infants. Meta-analyses show little impact of those factors on main conclusions...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720399/prenatal-and-postnatal-administration-of-prebiotics-and-probiotics
#19
REVIEW
Kristin Sohn, Mark A Underwood
Colonization of the neonatal gut by beneficial bacteria is important for the establishment and maintenance of the mucosal barrier, thus protecting the neonate from enteric pathogens and local and systemic inflammation. The neonatal microbiome is influenced by infant diet, environment, and the maternal microbiome. Dysbiosis in pregnancy increases the risk of pre-eclampsia, diabetes, infection, preterm labor, and later childhood atopy. Dysbiosis of the neonatal gut plays an important role in colic in the term infant, in the disease processes which plague preterm infants, including necrotizing enterocolitis and sepsis, and in the long-term outcomes of neonates...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28720398/perinatal-and-neonatal-use-of-paracetamol-for-pain-relief
#20
REVIEW
Karel Allegaert, John N van den Anker
Paracetamol (acetaminophen) is the most widely used drug to treat pain or fever in pregnant women or neonates, but its pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) warrant a focused analysis. During pregnancy, there is an important increase in paracetamol clearance. Consequently, it is reasonable to anticipate that the analgesic effect of paracetamol will decrease faster, whereas higher doses may result in even higher oxidative toxic metabolites. Therefore, most peripartal PD data relate to multimodal analgesia strategies...
October 2017: Seminars in Fetal & Neonatal Medicine
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