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Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514266/pulmonary-vascular-function-and-aerobic-exercise-capacityat-moderate-altitude
#1
Vitalie Faoro, Gael Deboeck, Marco Vicenzi, Anne-Fleur Gaston, Bamodi Simaga, Grégory Doucende, Ilona Hapkova, Emma Roca, Enric Subirats, Fabienne Durand, Robert Naeije
PURPOSE: There has been suggestion that a greater "pulmonary vascular reserve" defined by a low pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and a high lung diffusing capacity (DL) allows for a superior aerobic exercise capacity. How pulmonary vascular reserve might affect exercise capacity at moderate altitude is not known. METHODS: Thirty-eight healthy subjects underwent an exercise stress echocardiography of the pulmonary circulation, combined with measurements of DL for nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO) and a cardio-pulmonary exercise test at sea level and at the altitude of 2250m...
May 17, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514267/systolic-and-diastolic-lv-mechanics-during-and-following-resistance-exercise
#2
Eric J Stöhr, Mike Stembridge, Rob Shave, T Jake Samuel, Keeron Stone, Joseph I Esformes
PURPOSE: To improve the current understanding of the impact of resistance exercise on the heart, by examining the acute responses of left ventricular (LV) strain, twist and untwisting rate ('LV mechanics'). METHODS: LV echocardiographic images were recorded in systole and diastole before, during and immediately after (7-12 s) double leg press exercise at two intensities (30% and 60% of maximum strength, 1-repetition-maximum, 1RM). Speckle tracking analysis generated LV strain, twist and untwisting rate data...
May 16, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509764/environmental-and-physiological-factors-affect-football-head-impact-biomechanics
#3
Jason P Mihalik, Adam Z Sumrall, Susan W Yeargin, Kevin M Guskiewicz, Kevin B King, Scott C Trulock, Edgar W Shields
PURPOSE: Recent anecdotal trends suggest a disproportionate number of head injuries in collegiate football players occur during preseason football camp. In warmer climates, this season also represents the highest risk for heat-related illness among collegiate football players. Since concussion and heat illnesses share many common symptoms, we need 1) to understand if environmental conditions, body temperature, and hydration status affect head impact biomechanics; and 2) to determine if an in-helmet thermistor could provide a valid measure of gastrointestinal temperature...
May 15, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509763/achilles-tendon-load-is-progressively-increased-with-reductions-in-walking-speed
#4
Torsten Brauner, Philippe Pourcelot, Nathalie Crevier-Denoix, Thomas Horstmann, Scott C Wearing
INTRODUCTION: Achilles tendon rehabilitation protocols commonly recommend a gradual increase in walking speed to progressively intensify tendon loading. This study used transmission-mode ultrasound to evaluate the influence of walking speed on loading of the human Achilles tendon in vivo. METHODS: Axial transmission speed of ultrasound was measured in the right Achilles tendon of 33 adults (mean ± SD; age, 29 ± 3 years; height, 1.725 ± 0.069 m; weight, 71.4 ± 19...
May 15, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509762/beetroot-juice-increases-human-muscle-force-without-changing-ca2-handling-proteins
#5
Jamie Whitfield, Daniel Gamu, George J F Heigenhauser, Luc J C van Loon, Lawrence L Spriet, A Russell Tupling, Graham P Holloway
Dietary inorganic nitrate (NO3) supplementation improves skeletal muscle (SkM) contractile efficiency, and while rodent literature has suggested improvements in calcium handling or redox modifications as likely explanations, the direct mechanism-of-action in humans remains unknown. PURPOSE: To examine the effects of 7-d of beetroot juice (BRJ) supplementation on SkM contractile characteristics and function. METHODS: Recreationally active males (n=8) underwent transcutaneous electrical muscle stimulation of the vastus lateralis for evaluation of contractile characteristics before (pre) and after (post) 7-d of BRJ supplementation (280 mL/day, ~26 mmol NO3)...
May 15, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514265/television-viewing-time-and-inflammatory-related-mortality
#6
Megan S Grace, Francis Dillon, Elizabeth Lm Barr, Sarah K Keadle, Neville Owen, David W Dunstan
PURPOSE: Television (TV) viewing time is associated with increased risk of all-cause, cardiovascular and cancer mortality. While TV time is detrimentally associated with key inflammatory markers, the associations of TV time with other inflammatory-related mortality (with a predominant inflammatory, oxidative or infectious component, but not attributable to cancer or cardiovascular causes), are unknown. METHODS: Among 8,933 Australian adults (4,593 never-smokers) from the baseline (1999/2000) Australian Diabetes, Obesity and Lifestyle Study (median follow-up, 13...
May 12, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28514264/breaks-in-sitting-time-effects-on-continuously-monitored-glucose-and-blood-pressure
#7
Dharini M Bhammar, Brandon J Sawyer, Wesley J Tucker, Glenn A Gaesser
PURPOSE: We examined the effects of interrupting prolonged sitting with multiple 2-min walking breaks or one 30-min continuous walking session on glucose control and ambulatory blood pressure (ABP). METHODS: Ten overweight/obese, physically inactive participants (5 men; 32±5 y, BMI 30.3±4.6 kg·m) participated in this randomized four-trial crossover study, with each trial performed on a separate, simulated workday lasting 9h: 1) 30 min of continuous walking at 71±4% HRmax (30min-MOD); 2) 21x2-min bouts of moderate-intensity walking at 53±5% HRmax (2min-MOD), each performed every 20 min (42 min total); 3) 8x2-min bouts of vigorous-intensity walking at 79±4% HRmax (2min-VIG), each performed every h (16 min total); 4) 9h of prolonged sitting (SIT)...
May 12, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489687/consistently-high-level-of-cardiorespiratory-fitness-and-incidence-of-type-2-diabetes
#8
Haruki Momma, Susumu S Sawada, I-Min Lee, Yuko Gando, Ryoko Kawakami, Shin Terada, Motohiko Miyachi, Chihiro Kinugawa, Takashi Okamoto, Koji Tsukamoto, Cong Huang, Ryoichi Nagatomi, Steven N Blair
PURPOSE: Although the benefit of high cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) for the prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is widely accepted, whether consistently high CRF is necessary or transiently high CRF is sufficient is unclear. The present study was conducted to examine the hypothesis that consistently high level of CRF is more beneficial than transiently high CRF for the prevention of T2DM. METHODS: This cohort study was conducted in nondiabetic 7158 males aged 20 to 60, enrolled from 1986 to 1987...
May 9, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489686/scaling-the-oxygen-uptake-efficiency-slope-for-body-size-in-cystic-fibrosis
#9
Owen William Tomlinson, Alan Robert Barker, Patrick John Oades, Craig Anthony Williams
PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to describe the relationship between body size and the oxygen uptake efficiency slope (OUES) in paediatric patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) and healthy controls (CON), in order to identify appropriate scaling procedures to adjust the influence of body size upon OUES. METHODS: The OUES was derived using maximal and submaximal points from cardiopulmonary exercise testing in 72 children (36 CF and 36 CON). OUES was subsequently scaled for stature, body mass (BM) and body surface area (BSA) using ratio-standard (Y/X) and allometric (Y/X) methods...
May 9, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489685/solid-organ-laceration-in-an-adolescent-soccer-player-a-case-report
#10
Michael Visenio, Keely Buesing, Kody Moffatt
Pediatric solid organ lacerations are a relatively uncommon but potentially dangerous injury that must be addressed urgently once recognized. Seen most often during recreational or team sports, they usually occur after a blunt deceleration mechanism to the abdomen or flank. Depending on the severity of injury, solid organ laceration may not be immediately apparent clinically. This emphasizes the importance of sideline witnessing and evaluation, acting quickly once symptoms develop, and placing importance on safe sporting technique...
May 9, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28489684/calculated-versus-measured-mvv-surrogate-marker-of-ventilatory-capacity-in-pediatric-cpet
#11
Kelly L Colwell, Rajeev Bhatia
INTRODUCTION: Maximum Voluntary Ventilation (MVV), a surrogate marker of maximum ventilatory capacity, allows for measuring ventilatory reserve during Cardiopulmonary Exercise Stress Testing (CPET) which is necessary to assess ventilatory limitation. MVV can be measured directly during a patient maneuver or indirectly by calculating from FEV1 (FEV1 X 40). We investigated for a potential difference between calculated MVV and measured MVV in pediatric subjects, and which better represents maximum ventilatory capacity during CPET...
May 9, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28471812/comparisons-of-noninvasive-methods-used-to-assess-exercise-stroke-volume-in-hfpef
#12
Erik H Van Iterson, Thomas P Olson, Barry A Borlaug, Bruce D Johnson, Eric M Snyder
INTRODUCTION: Cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) plays an important role in properly phenotyping signs and symptoms of heart failure with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF). The prognostic value of CPET is strengthened when accompanied by cardiac hemodynamic measurements. Although recognized as the 'Gold' standard, cardiac catheterization is impractical for routine CPET. Thus, advancing the scientific/methodologic understanding of noninvasive techniques for exercise cardiac hemodynamic assessment is clinically impactful in HFpEF...
May 4, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28463902/practicing-the-test-produces-strength-equivalent-to-higher-volume-training
#13
Kevin T Mattocks, Samuel L Buckner, Matthew B Jessee, Scott J Dankel, J Grant Mouser, Jeremy P Loenneke
PURPOSE: To determine if muscle growth is important for increasing muscle strength or if changes in strength can be entirely explained from practicing the strength test. METHODS: Thirty-eight untrained individuals performed knee extension and chest press exercise for 8 weeks. Individuals were randomly assigned to either a high-volume training group (HYPER) or a group just performing the one repetition maximum (1RM) strength test (TEST). The HYPER group performed 4 sets to volitional failure (~8-12RM) while the TEST group performed up to 5 attempts to lift as much weight as possible one time each visit...
May 2, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28463901/a-mechanism-underlying-preventive-effect-of-high-intensity-training-on-colon-cancer
#14
Kaori Matsuo, Koji Sato, Ken Suemoto, Eri Miyamoto-Mikami, Noriyuki Fuku, Kazuhiko Higashida, Katsunori Tsuji, Yuzhong Xu, Xin Liu, Motoyuki Iemitsu, Takafumi Hamaoka, Izumi Tabata
INTRODUCTION: We examined effects of high intensity training on chemically induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in rat colon. We also investigated mechanisms that may underlie the results obtained, with a focus on secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine (SPARC), which has been proposed as an exercise-related factor of colon cancer prevention. METHODS: After an administration of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH), F344 rats executed high-intensity intermittent swimming training (HIIST) (twelve 20-sec swimming with a weight [16% body weight] with 10-sec pauses between the bouts) 5 days/week for 4 weeks...
May 2, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28463900/school-and-county-correlates-associated-with-youth-body-mass-index
#15
Yang Bai, Gregory J Welk
PURPOSE: The purpose of the study was to explore the utility of school and county level variables in explaining variability in children and adolescent Body Mass Index (BMI). METHODS: BMI data from nearly 2.5 million of children and adolescents were aggregated at the school level from more than 5000 schools in Texas. School level predictors included enrollment and the percentage of students qualifying for free and reduced lunch. Seven county level variables were obtained from the County Health Rankings website including adult obesity, food environment index, adult physical inactivity, access to exercise, college completion, childhood poverty, and income inequality...
May 2, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28463899/acute-metabolic-response-energy-expenditure-and-emg-activity-in-sitting-and-standing
#16
Ying Gao, Mika Silvennoinen, Arto Pesola, Heikki Kainulainen, Neil J Cronin, Taija Finni
PURPOSE: While merely standing up interrupts sedentary behavior, it is important to study acute metabolic responses during single bouts of sitting and standing to understand the physiological processes affecting the health of office workers. METHODS: 18 healthy middle aged women aged 49.4 ± 7.9 years (range: 40 to 64) with a BMI of 23.4 ± 2.8 kg·m volunteered for this laboratory-based randomized crossover trial where they performed two hours desk work either in sitting or standing postures after overnight fasting...
May 2, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28452866/effects-of-dopamine-and-norepinephrine-on-exercise-induced-oculomotor-fatigue
#17
Charlotte J W Connell, Benjamin Thompson, Jason Turuwhenua, Alexa Srzich, Nicholas Gant
INTRODUCTION: Fatigue-induced impairments in the control of eye movements are detectable via reduced eye movement velocity following a bout of prolonged, strenuous exercise. Slower eye movements caused by neural fatigue within the oculomotor system can be prevented by caffeine and upregulation of central catecholamines may be responsible for this effect. This study explored the individual contribution of dopamine and norepinephrine to fatigue-related impairments in oculomotor control...
April 28, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28452865/are-all-heat-loads-created-equal
#18
Robert D Meade, Glen P Kenny
PURPOSE: We evaluated physiological responses during exercise at a fixed evaporative requirement for heat balance (Ereq) but varying combinations of metabolic and environmental heat load. METHODS: Nine healthy, physically active males (age: 46±8 years) performed four experimental sessions consisting of 75-min of semi-recumbent cycling at various ambient temperatures. Whole-body dry heat loss (direct calorimetry) was monitored continuously as was heat production (indirect calorimetry), which was adjusted to achieve an Ereq of 400 W...
April 28, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28441164/information-acquisition-differences-between-experienced-and-novice-time-trial-cyclists
#19
Manhal Boya, Tom Foulsham, Florentina Hettinga, David Parry, Emily Williams, Hollie Jones, Andrew Sparks, David Marchant, Paul Ellison, Craig Bridge, Lars McNaughton, Dominic Micklewright
PURPOSE: To use eye-tracking technology to directly compare information acquisition behavior of experienced and novice cyclists during a self-paced 10 mile (16.1 km) time-trial. METHOD: Two groups of novice (N=10) and experienced cyclists (N=10) performed a 10-mile self-paced time-trial (TT) on two separate occasions during which a number of feedback variables (speed, distance, power output, cadence, heart rate, and time) were projected within their view. A large RPE scale was also presented next to the projected information and participants...
April 25, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28422771/slow-intermuscular-oscillations-are-associated-with-cocontraction-steadiness
#20
Nayef E Ahmar, Minoru Shinohara
PURPOSE: Voluntary muscle contraction often involves low-frequency correlated neural oscillations across muscles, which may degrade steady cocontraction between antagonistic muscles with distinct levels of activation per each muscle (unbalanced cocontraction). The purposes of the study were 1) to determine whether there is an association between the low-frequency correlated EMG oscillations and performance of steady unbalanced cocontraction across individuals and 2) to determine whether a bout of out-of-phase cocontraction practice reduces the in-phase low-frequency correlated neural oscillations and improves the performance of steady unbalanced cocontraction...
April 19, 2017: Medicine and Science in Sports and Exercise
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