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Journal of Sleep Research

Anne-Katrine F Bundgaard, Jette Asmussen, Nadia S Pedersen, Niels Bilenberg
This study investigated whether early signs of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in toddlers aged 2-3 years are associated with disturbed sleep and activity levels. Participants were recruited from the Odense Child Cohort, and children scoring above the 93rd percentile on the ADHD scale of the Child Behaviour Checklist 1½-5 were categorised as cases and compared with age- and gender-matched normal-scoring controls. Daytime and nocturnal activity for 24 children with ADHD traits (cases) and 25 healthy controls was assessed through 7 days of actigraphy, and parents completed the Children's Sleep Habits Questionnaire (CSHQ) and the ADHD Rating Scale IV Preschool Version (ADHD-RS)...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Alex Agostini, Kurt Lushington, Mark Kohler, Jillian Dorrian
This study examined the associations between self-reported sleep timing and quality, and the frequency of breakfast and junk food consumption in 28,010 Australian school students (mean ± SD age = 13.3 ± 1.2 years, 51% male). After controlling for age, sex and socioeconomic status, regression analyses revealed that the odds of missing breakfast were significantly higher in children who reported poor sleep or later bedtimes, while the odds of junk food consumption were significantly higher in children reporting later weeknight bedtimes (p < 0...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Pierpaolo Baiamonte, Emilia Mazzuca, Claudia I Gruttad'Auria, Alessandra Castrogiovanni, Claudia Marino, Davide Lo Nardo, Marco Basile, Margherita Algeri, Salvatore Battaglia, Oreste Marrone, Andrea Gagliardo, Maria R Bonsignore
Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the first-choice treatment for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing. Automatic bilevel ventilation can be used to treat obstructive sleep-disordered breathing when CPAP is ineffective, but clinical experience is still limited. To assess the outcome of titration with CPAP and automatic bilevel ventilation, the charts of 356 outpatients (obstructive sleep apnea, n = 242; chronic obstructive pulmonary disease + obstructive sleep apnea overlap, n = 80; obesity hypoventilation syndrome [OHS], n = 34; 103 females) treated for obstructive sleep-disordered breathing from January 2014 to April 2017 were reviewed...
March 12, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Alexander Malafeev, Ximena Omlin, Aleksandra Wierzbicka, Adam Wichniak, Wojciech Jernajczyk, Robert Riener, Peter Achermann
Quantitative electroencephalogram analysis (e.g. spectral analysis) has become an important tool in sleep research and sleep medicine. However, reliable results are only obtained if artefacts are removed or excluded. Artefact detection is often performed manually during sleep stage scoring, which is time consuming and prevents application to large datasets. We aimed to test the performance of mostly simple algorithms of artefact detection in polysomnographic recordings, derive optimal parameters and test their generalization capacity...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Stephanie J Crowley, Charmane I Eastman
Sleep timing shifts later during adolescence (second decade). This trend reverses at ~20 years and continues to shift earlier into adulthood. The current analysis examined the hypothesis that a longer free-running circadian period during late adolescence (14-17 years) compared with adulthood (30-45 years) accounts for sleep timing differences. Sex and ancestry were also examined because previous reports find that women and those with African-American ancestry have shorter free-running periods. Circadian period was measured using an ultradian dark-light protocol (2 hr dark/sleep, 2 hr dim room light [~20 lux]/wake) over 3...
March 8, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Ina Djonlagic, Daniel Aeschbach, Stephanie Litwack Harrison, Dennis Dean, Kristine Yaffe, Sonia Ancoli-Israel, Katie Stone, Susan Redline
The pathophysiological processes of Alzheimer's dementia predate its clinical manifestation. Sleep disturbances can accelerate the aging process and are common features of dementia. This study examined whether quantitative sleep electroencephalogram changes predate the clinical development of mild cognitive impairment and/or incident dementia. We collected data from a nested case-control sample of women (mean age 83 years) from the Sleep and Cognition Study, an ancillary study to the longitudinal Study of Osteoporotic Fractures, who were characterized as cognitively normal at the time of a baseline polysomnography study (Study of Osteoporotic Fractures visit 8) based on a Mini-Mental Status Exam (MMSE) score >24...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Kelly M Tu, Lori Elmore-Staton, Joseph A Buckhalt, Mona El-Sheikh
Utilizing a multi-method design, the present study examined the association between maternal sleep, assessed via actigraphy and self-reports, and permissive parenting (e.g. lax, inconsistent discipline) during adolescence, as well as the extent to which this association differed by mothers' race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. The sample was comprised of 234 mothers (M age = 41.76 years, SD = 6.25; 67% European-American, 31% African-American, 2% other race/ethnicities) and 237 adolescents (113 boys, 124 girls; M age = 15...
March 5, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Mink S Schinkelshoek, Isabelle M Smolders, Claire E Donjacour, Wisse P van der Meijden, Erik W van Zwet, Rolf Fronczek, Gert Jan Lammers
Narcolepsy type 1 is characterised by an increase in body weight after disease onset, frequently leading to obesity. It was suggested that this weight gain may be counteracted by treatment with sodium oxybate. We here provide longitudinal body mass index data of patients with narcolepsy type 1 after starting treatment with sodium oxybate, compared with patients in whom treatment with modafinil was initiated. Eighty-one individuals with narcolepsy type 1 fulfilled the entry criteria for this retrospective study: 59 had newly started treatment with sodium oxybate and 22 had newly started modafinil...
March 4, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Denise C Jarrin, Hans Ivers, Manon Lamy, Ivy Y Chen, Allison G Harvey, Charles M Morin
Two phenotypes have been proposed: insomnia with objective near-normal sleep duration, related to increased psychological symptoms, and insomnia with objective short sleep duration, associated with cardiometabolic morbidity. Reduced heart rate variability has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of cardiometabolic disease; however, there are little data on whether cardiovascular function differs between patients with objective short sleep duration and near-normal sleep duration. Participants (Mage  = 49...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Susanna Mantovani, Simon S Smith, Richard Gordon, John D O'Sullivan
Sleep and circadian alterations are amongst the very first symptoms experienced in Parkinson's disease, and sleep alterations are present in the majority of patients with overt clinical manifestation of Parkinson's disease. However, the magnitude of sleep and circadian dysfunction in Parkinson's disease, and its influence on the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease remains often unclear and a matter of debate. In particular, the confounding influences of dopaminergic therapy on sleep and circadian dysfunction are a major challenge, and need to be more carefully addressed in clinical studies...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Jinxiao Zhang, Esther Yuet Ying Lau, Janet H Hsiao
Resting-state spontaneous neural activities consume far more biological energy than stimulus-induced activities, suggesting their significance. However, existing studies of sleep loss and emotional functioning have focused on how sleep deprivation modulates stimulus-induced emotional neural activities. The current study aimed to investigate the impacts of sleep deprivation on the brain network of emotional functioning using electroencephalogram during a resting state. Two established resting-state electroencephalogram indexes (i...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Lone Baandrup, Julie A E Christensen, Birgitte Fagerlund, Poul Jennum
Neurocognitive impairment is a trait marker of schizophrenia, but no effective treatment has yet been identified. Sleep spindle deficits have been associated with diminished sleep-dependent memory learning. We examined whether this link could be extended into various cognitive domains by investigating the association of a neurocognitive test battery (the Brief Assessment of Cognition in Schizophrenia) with sleep spindle activity and morphology. We examined 37 outpatients diagnosed with schizophrenia and medicated with both antipsychotics and benzodiazepines...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Peter Horvath, David L Tarnoki, Adam D Tarnoki, Kinga Karlinger, Zsofia Lazar, Gyorgy Losonczy, Laszlo Kunos, Andras Bikov
The complement system may play a role in the systemic inflammation characterising obstructive sleep apnea; however, this has not been investigated before. We aimed to study the involvement of effector complement elements in obstructive sleep apnea, namely C3a, C5a and SC5b-9. Venous blood was collected in 50 patients with obstructive sleep apnea and 26 control subjects in the evening and the following morning. Plasma complement proteins were analysed with ELISA. Complement factor levels were compared between the two groups and correlated with clinical variables...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Anders Broström, Amir H Pakpour, Per Nilsen, Benjamin Gardner, Martin Ulander
The benefits of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea are well established, but adherence tends to be low. Research exploring CPAP practitioners' beliefs around determinants of CPAP adherence, and the actions they use in clinical practice to promote CPAP adherence is lacking. This study aimed to: (i) develop and validate a questionnaire to assess beliefs and current practices among CPAP practitioners; (ii) explore practitioners' beliefs regarding the main determinants of patient adherence, and the actions practitioners most commonly use to promote CPAP adherence; and (iii) explore the associations between perceived determinants and adherence-promotion actions...
March 1, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Mirjam L Kerpershoek, Niki Antypa, Julia F Van den Berg
Caffeine is often used to reduce sleepiness; however, research suggests that it can also cause poor sleep quality. The timing of caffeine use, amongst other factors, is likely to be important for the effects it has on sleep quality. In addition, individual differences exist in the effect of caffeine on sleep quality. This cross-sectional study investigated the influence of the timing of caffeine consumption on and a possible moderating role of chronotype in the relationship between caffeine consumption and sleep quality in 880 students (74...
February 25, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Shanika R Samarasekera, Samuel F Berkovic, Ingrid E Scheffer
The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and tolerability of open-label lacosamide in patients with refractory sleep-related hypermotor epilepsy. The study was a case review of eight patients with refractory sleep-related hypermotor epilepsy treated with lacosamide. Seizure diaries compared the mean baseline seizure frequency with the most recent 3 months of follow-up. Five (62.5%) patients were responders, defined as ≥50% reduction in seizure frequency, over a mean duration of exposure of 21.5 months...
February 25, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Joëlle Pion-Massicotte, Roger Godbout, Pierre Savard, Jean-François Roy
Portable polysomnography is often too complex and encumbering for recording sleep at home. We recorded sleep using a biometric shirt (electrocardiogram sensors, respiratory inductance plethysmography bands and an accelerometer) in 21 healthy young adults recorded in a sleep laboratory for two consecutive nights, together with standard polysomnography. Polysomnographic recordings were scored using standard methods. An algorithm was developed to classify the biometric shirt recordings into rapid eye movement sleep, non-rapid eye movement sleep and wake...
February 23, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Kate Bartel, Chao Huang, Ben Maddock, Paul Williamson, Michael Gradisar
Difficulties falling asleep are common among adolescents, especially during times of stress. Adolescents may thus benefit from brief techniques (15 min) that decrease pre-sleep cognitive-emotional arousal and sleep-onset latency. The present study used a 3 (intervention: mindfulness bodyscan mp3, constructive worry, control) by 3 (time: baseline, week 1, week 2) mixed-model design on a school-based sample of adolescents (N = 232; Mage  = 15.9 ± 0.8 years, range = 14-18 years; 19% male), and a sub-sample of adolescents with prolonged sleep-onset latency (i...
February 13, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Daniel L R Kuetting, Andreas Feisst, Alois M Sprinkart, Rami Homsi, Julian Luetkens, Daniel Thomas, Hans H Schild, Darius Dabir
Fatigue and sleep deprivation are common phenomena, especially among medical professionals and shift workers. Studies have proven that short episodes of sleep deprivation can lead to sympathetic hyperactivity with an elevation in blood pressure, heart rate, and an increased secretion of stress hormones (e.g. cortisol, noradrenaline, thyroid hormones). In this study investigating cardiac strain in 20 healthy subjects undergoing short-term sleep deprivation, it could be shown for the first time that 24-hr-shift-related short-term sleep deprivation leads to a significant increase in cardiac contractility, blood pressure, heart rate and stress hormone secretion...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
Panagiotis Aristotelous, George Aphamis, Giorgos K Sakkas, Eleni Andreou, Marios Pantzaris, Theodoros Kyprianou, Georgios M Hadjigeorgiou, Mauro Manconi, Christoforos D Giannaki
Dehydration is associated with several alternations in body homeostasis involving both physiological and mental aspects. In addition some studies have reported a negative effect of dehydration on subjectively assessed sleep-related parameters. The aim of the current study was to examine for the first time the effect of controlled dehydration on sleep quality and quantity using the gold-standard method of polysomnography. Twelve healthy male volunteers participated in this study (23.4 ± 0.8 years). Participants performed an in-house full polysomnographic assessment in two different occasions taking place in random order: (i) in a dehydrated state; and (ii) in a euhydrated state...
February 7, 2018: Journal of Sleep Research
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