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Journal of Neurotrauma

Sandro M Krieg, Raimund Trabold, Nikolaus Plesnila
Arginine-vasopressin (AVP) V1 receptors are known to mediate brain edema formation after traumatic brain injury (TBI). So far, however, AVP V1 receptors were only inhibited by genetic deletion or prior to trauma. Therefore the current study aimed to determine the therapeutic window of AVP V1 receptors anatomization after TBI. Male C57BL/6 mice (n=7 per group) were subjected to controlled cortical impact (CCI) and 500 ng of a selective peptide V1 receptor antagonist (V1880) were applied by intracerebroventricular injection 5 min, 1, 3, and 6 hours thereafter...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Michelle Hook, Sarah Woller, Eric Bancroft, Miriam Aceves, Mary Katherine Funk, John Hartman, Sandra M Garraway
Opioids and NSAIDs are commonly used to manage pain in the early phase of spinal cord injury (SCI). Despite its analgesic efficacy, however, our studies suggest that intrathecal (i.t.) morphine undermines locomotor recovery and increases lesion size in a rodent model of SCI. Similarly, intravenous (i.v.) morphine attenuates locomotor recovery. The current study explores whether i.v. morphine also increases lesion size after a spinal contusion (T12) injury, and quantifies the cell types that are affected by early opioid administration...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Marie-Pascale Côté, Marion Murray, Michel A Lemay
Body-weight supported locomotor training (BWST) promotes recovery of load-bearing stepping in lower mammals, but its efficacy in individuals with a spinal cord injury (SCI) is limited and highly dependent on injury severity. While animal models with complete spinal transections recover stepping with step-training, motor complete SCI individuals do not, despite similarly intensive training. In this review, we examine the significant differences between humans and animal models that may explain this discrepancy in the results obtained with BWST...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Rachel Sayko Adams, John D Corrigan, Beth A Mohr, Thomas V Williams, Mary Jo Larson
This study examines whether the relationship between traumatic brain injury (TBI) and post-deployment binge drinking is independent of screening positive for mental health problems among male and female service members. Data are from the Substance Use and Psychological Injury Combat Study of Army members returning from deployment to Afghanistan or Iraq in fiscal years 2008-2011. The sample consists of 240,694 male and 26,406 female active duty members who completed initial and follow-up questionnaires. The initial questionnaire, completed at the end of deployment, included screens for TBI and mental health problems (posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, harmful thoughts)...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Mingxiong Huang, Deborah L Harrington, Ashley Robb, Annemarie Angeles, Sharon Nichols, Angela I Drake, Tao Song, Mithun Diwakar, Charles W Huang, Victoria Risbrough, Anders M Dale, Hauke Bartsch, Scott Matthews, Jeffrey W Huang, Roland R Lee, Dewleen G Baker
Blast mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is a leading cause of sustained impairment in military service members and Veterans. However, the mechanism of persistent disability is not fully understood. The present study investigated disturbances in brain functioning in mTBI participants using a source-imaging-based approach to analyze functional connectivity (FC) from resting-state magnetoencephalography (rs-MEG). Study participants included 26 active-duty service members or Veterans who had blast mTBI with persistent post-concussive symptoms and 22 healthy control active-duty service members or Veterans...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Naseem Jamnia, Janice H Urban, Grace Beth Stuzmann, Sarah Chiren, Emily Reisenbigler, Robert Marr, Daniel A Peterson, Dorothy A Kozlowski
Repeat concussions (RC) can result in significant long-term neurological consequences and increased risk for neurodegenerative disease compared to single concussion (SC). Mechanisms underlying this difference are poorly understood and best elucidated using an animal model. To the best of our knowledge, there is no closed-head model in the adult rat using a commercially available device. We developed a novel and clinically relevant closed-head injury (CHI) model of both single and multiple concussions in the adult rat using a controlled cortical impact (CCI) device...
October 20, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Abigail Livny, Anat Biegon, Tammar Kushnir, Sagi Harnof, Chen Hoffmann, Eyal Fruchter, Mark Weiser
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is known to have a substantial, though highly variable, impact on cognitive abilities. Due to the wide range of cognitive abilities among healthy individuals, an objective assessment of TBI-related cognitive loss requires an accurate measurement of premorbid cognitive performance. To address this problem, we recruited 50 adults who sustained a TBI and had performed a cognitive baseline assessment in adolescence as part of the aptitude tests mandated by the Israeli Defense Forces...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
John E Cebak, Indrapal N Singh, Rachel L Hill, Juan Wang, Edward D Hall
Lipid peroxidation is a key contributor to the pathophysiology of traumatic brain injury (TBI). Traditional antioxidant therapies are intended to scavenge the free radicals responsible for either the initiation or the propagation of lipid peroxidation (LP). A more recently explored approach involves scavenging the terminal LP breakdown products that are highly reactive and neurotoxic carbonyl compounds 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and acrolein to prevent their covalent modification and rendering of cellular proteins non-functional leading to loss of ionic homeostasis, mitochondrial failure, and subsequent neuronal death...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Ryan Dean Fortune, Raymond J Grill, Christine Beeton, Mark Tanner, Redwan Huq, David S Loose
Spinal cord injury (SCI) results in devastating changes to almost all aspects of a patient's life. In addition to a permanent loss of sensory and motor function, males will also frequently exhibit a profound loss of fertility through poorly understood mechanisms. We demonstrate that SCI causes measureable pathology in the testis both acutely (24 hours) and chronically, up to 1.5 years post injury, leading to loss in sperm motility and viability. SCI has been shown in humans and rats to induce leukocytospermia, with the presence of inflammatory cytokines, anti-sperm antibodies, and reactive oxygen species found within the ejaculate...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Markus Wirz, Orpheus Mach, Doris Maier, John Benito-Penalva, Julian Taylor, Ana Esclarin, Volker Dietz
The aim of this study was to evaluate if the effect of longer training times (50 instead of 25 minutes per day) using a robotic device results in a better outcome of walking ability of subjects with a sub-acute motor complete (AIS B) and incomplete (AIS C) spinal cord injury (SCI). Twenty-one patients were enrolled in the study whereof, 18 completed on average 34 trainings in eight weeks. Longer training times resulted in better locomotor function. The second important result of the study is that a beneficial effect can be achieved by the application of a robotic device for prolonged training sessions without requiring more personal resources...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
William Peacock
Dear Editor I read with great interest the manuscript titled "A New Panel of Blood Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Mild Traumatic Brain Injury/Concussion in Adults" by Shan R, et al, published in the January issue of the Journal. (1) I do have some questions. The key to marker discovery studies is a precise and accurate description of how the population was identified, including controls. I have significant concerns about the control population in the manuscript. In the presentation the characteristics of the control group are unclear, described only as "not patients in the ED" and with the same exclusion criteria of the other cohorts...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Jessica M Marbourg, Anna Bratasz, Xiaokui Mo, Phillip G Popovich
People who suffer a traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) are at increased risk for developing dermatological complications. These conditions increase cost of care, incidence of rehospitalization, and the risk for developing other infections. The consequences of dermatological complications after SCI are likely exacerbated further by post-injury deficits in neural-immune signaling. Indeed, a functional immune system is essential for optimal host defense and tissue repair. Here, we tested the hypothesis that SCI at high spinal levels, which causes systemic immune suppression, would suppress cutaneous inflammation below the level of injury...
October 17, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Miriam Aceves, Eric Bancroft, Alejandro R Aceves, Michelle Hook
Opioids are frequently used for the treatment of pain following spinal cord injury (SCI). Unfortunately, we have shown that morphine administered in the acute phase of SCI results in significant, adverse secondary consequences including compromised locomotor and sensory recovery. Similarly, we showed that selective activation of the κ-opioid receptor (KOR), even at a dose 32-fold lower than morphine, is sufficient to attenuate recovery of locomotor function. In the current study, we tested whether activation of the KOR is necessary to produce morphine's adverse effects using nor-Binaltorphimine (norBNI), a selective KOR antagonist...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Miriam Schrafl-Altermatt, Volker Dietz, Marc Bolliger
The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of a continuous locomotor training on leg muscle EMG exhaustion during assisted stepping movements in a patient with motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI). EMG exhaustion and loss of potentials starts to develop in non-trained patients usually around six months after injury. In the trained patient examined in this study exhaustion was also observed but occurred with a delay of several months. In contrast to a non-trained patient no more EMG exhaustion was observed in a very chronic stage...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Ashley E Mohrman, Mahmoud Farrag, He Huang, Stephan Ossowski, Stephanie Haft, Leah P Shriver, Nic D Leipzig
Syringomyelia is a condition of the spinal cord in which a syrinx, or fluid-filled cavity, forms from trauma, malformation, or general disorder. Previous work has shown that in noncanalicular syringomyelia irregular flow and pressure conditions enhance the volumetric growth of syrinxes. A better understanding of the underlying molecular pathways associated with syrinx formation will unveil targets for treatments and possibly prevention of syringomyelia in the future. In this study, we performed an established surgical induction of a syrinx using quisqualic acid and kaolin injections in rats to characterize the injury at the molecular level by RNA sequencing and metabolomics techniques at three and six weeks post-injury...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Frances Corrigan, Alina Arulsamy, Jason Teng, Lyndsey E Collins-Praino
Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of disability and death worldwide, affecting as many as 54,000,000-60,000,000 people annually. TBI is associated with significant impairments in brain function, impacting cognitive, emotional, behavioral, and physical functioning. Although much previous research has focused on the impairment immediately following injury, TBI may have much longer-lasting consequences, including neuropsychiatric disorders and cognitive impairment. TBI, even mild brain injury, has also been recognized as a significant risk factor for the later development of dementia and Alzheimer's disease...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Karolina J Urban, Lily Riggs, Greg D Wells, Michelle Keightley, Jen-Kai Chen, Alain Ptito, Philippe Fait, Tim Taha, Katia J Sinopoli
Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is common in youth, especially in those who participate in sport. Recent investigations from our group have shown that asymptomatic children and adolescents with mTBI continue to exhibit alterations in neural activity and cognitive performance compared with those without a history of mTBI. This is an intriguing finding, given that current return-to-learn and return-to-play protocols rely predominately on subjective symptom reports, which may not be sensitive enough to detect subtle injury-related changes...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Yilin Mao, Ryan S Tonkin, Tara Nguyen, Simon J O'Carroll, Louise F B Nicholson, Colin R Green, Gila Moalem-Taylor, Catherine A Gorrie
Blocking of Connexin43 hemichannels, the main gap junction protein located on astrocytes in the central nervous system, has been shown to reduce neural injury in a number of models. We demonstrated previously that local administration of a Connexin43 mimetic peptide, Peptide5, reduces secondary tissue damage after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we investigated whether acute systemic delivery of Peptide5 is also protective in a model of SCI. Rats were subjected to a mild spinal cord contusion using the Multicentre Animal Spinal Cord Injury Study impactor and were injected intraperitoneally with Peptide5 or a scrambled peptide immediately and at 2 h and 4 h post-injury...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Kurt A Mossberg, William J Durham, Dennis J Zgaljardic, Charles R Gilkison, Christopher P Danesi, Melinda Sheffield-Moore, Brent E Masel, Randall J Urban
We explored the effects of recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) replacement on physical and cognitive functioning in subjects with a moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) with abnormal growth hormone (GH) secretion. Fifteen individuals who sustained a TBI at least 12 months prior to study enrollment were identified as having abnormal GH secretion by glucagon stimulation testing (maximum GH response less than 8 ng/mL). Peak cardiorespiratory capacity, body composition, and muscle force testing were assessed at baseline and one year after rhGH replacement...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
Gustav Folmer Genét, Peter Bentzer, Sisse Rye Ostrowski, Pär Ingemar Johansson
Traumatic brain injury and hemorrhagic shock is associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown and edema formation. Recent animal studies have shown that fresh frozen plasma (FFP) resuscitation reduces brain swelling and improves endothelial function compared to isotonic NaCl (NS). The aim of this study was to investigate whether pooled and pathogen-reduced plasma (OctaplasLG(®) [OCTA]; Octapharma, Stockholm, Sweden) was comparable to FFP with regard to effects on brain water content, BBB permeability, and plasma biomarkers of endothelial glycocalyx shedding and cell damage...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Neurotrauma
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