Read by QxMD icon Read

Journal of Anesthesia

Sameer Sethi, Souvik Maitra, Vikas Saini, Tanvir Samra, S K Malhotra
BACKGROUND: The current available literature is not unanimous in reporting the utility of short-axis and long-axis techniques for radial artery cannulation in both adults and children. This study was designed to compare short-axis out-of-plane (SA-OOP) and long-axis in-plane (LA-IP) techniques in ultrasound-guided radial artery cannulation in adults. METHODS: In this prospective randomized controlled trial, 150 adult patients of American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-III aged between 18 and 70 years were included...
October 19, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Francesco Vasques, Luca Spiezia, Alberto Manfrini, Vincenzo Tarzia, Dario Fichera, Paolo Simioni, Gino Gerosa, Carlo Ori, Guido Di Gregorio
This retrospective, observational study compared the impact of a point-of-care rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM(®)) method versus conventional bleeding management in terms of postoperative (24-h) blood loss, intraoperative and postoperative (24-h) transfusion requirement and length of stay in the postoperative intensive care unit (ICU) in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. Forty consecutive patients undergoing cardiac surgery under ROTEM(®)-guided hemostatic management were enrolled; the control population included 40 selected patients undergoing similar interventions without ROTEM(®) monitoring...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Jun Atsuta, Satoki Inoue, Yuu Tanaka, Keiko Abe, Hiroyuki Nakase, Masahiko Kawaguchi
PURPOSE: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) is a common complication after craniotomy. Vomiting may be a potentially hazardous complication in neurosurgical patients. We compared the efficacy of fosaprepitant and droperidol for the prevention of PONV, vomiting in particular, after craniotomy. METHODS: Patients scheduled to undergo elective craniotomy were enrolled in the study and randomly divided in a double-blind manner into two groups to receive either 150 mg of fosaprepitant (group F) or 1...
October 18, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Gui-Zhen Yang, Fu-Shan Xue, Chao Sun
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 17, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Kouichiro Minami, Yota Kokubo, Ichinosuke Maeda, Shingo Hibino
In chest compression for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), the lower half of the sternum is pressed according to the American Heart Association (AHA) guidelines 2010. These have been no studies which identify the exact location of the applied by individual chest compressions. We developed a rubber power-flexible capacitive sensor that could measure the actual pressure point of chest compression in real time. Here, we examined the pressure point of chest compression by ambulance crews during CPR using a mannequin...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Andrea Russo, Domenico Luca Grieco, Francesca Bevilacqua, Gian Marco Anzellotti, Annamaria Scarano, Giovanni Scambia, Barbara Costantini, Elisabetta Marana
PURPOSE: This retrospective study aims to compare postoperative pain relief offered by continuous intravenous infusion of either fentanyl or morphine. METHODS: Sixty American Society of Anesthesiologists Physical Status I and II women who had undergone open gynecological surgery were enrolled. All patients received total intravenous postoperative analgesia for 24 h with continuous infusion of either fentanyl or morphine at comparable doses (38 patients received 0...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Nitesh Patel, Ayesha Bryant, Kensi Duncan, Promil Kukreja, Mark F Powell
PURPOSE: Intrathecal morphine provides superior pain control for patients undergoing cesarean delivery when compared to intravenous opioid patient-controlled analgesia. However, no study has assessed the overall cost associated with each modality as a primary outcome. The aim of this study is to determine the overall cost of each modality for the first 24 h post cesarean delivery. METHODS: Charts of patients undergoing cesarean delivery at our institution from January 1, 2014 to December 31, 2014 were reviewed...
October 14, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Daiki Yamanaka, Takashi Kawano, Atsushi Nishigaki, Bun Aoyama, Hiroki Tateiwa, Marie Shigematsu-Locatelli, Fabricio M Locatelli, Masataka Yokoyama
PURPOSE: In the present study, we examined whether and by what mechanisms dexmedetomidine (DMED) prevents the development of systemic inflammation (SI)-induced cognitive dysfunction in aged rats. METHODS: Animals received a single intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection of either 5.0 mg/kg lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or vehicle. LPS-treated rats were further divided into three groups: early DMED, late DMED, or midazolam (MDZ) treatment (n = 12 each). Seven days after LPS injection, cognitive function was evaluated using a novel object recognition task, followed by measurement of hippocampal levels of proinflammatory cytokines and Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) expression...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Ken Shohara, Tomoko Goto, Goro Kuwahara, Yoshitoyo Isakari, Tomomi Moriya, Tukasa Yamamuro
PURPOSE: Numerous techniques have been used to reduce epistaxis during nasotracheal intubation. Rhinometry can assess nasal patency in preoperative conditions. However, the possible role of rhinometry in routine nasotracheal intubation has not been studied. METHODS: One hundred and one patients undergoing dental and maxillofacial surgery that required general anesthesia and nasotracheal intubation were enrolled. We examined whether symmetry or any asymmetry in bilateral airflow patterns by condensation of the expiration, assessed by preoperative rhinometry on seated position, increased the incidence of epistaxis and the need for a nasogastric catheter to guide the endotracheal tube into the oropharynx...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Anirban Som, Souvik Maitra, Sulagna Bhattacharjee, Dalim K Baidya
BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Optimum perioperative fluid administration may improve postoperative outcome after major surgery. This meta-analysis and systematic review has been aimed to determine the effect of dynamic goal directed fluid therapy (GDFT) on postoperative morbidity and mortality in non-cardiac surgical patients. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Meta-analysis of published prospective randomized controlled trials where GDFT based on non-invasive flow based hemodynamic measurement has been compared with a standard care...
October 13, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Manuel C Vallejo, Ahmed F Attaallah, Robert E Shapiro, Osama M Elzamzamy, Michael G Mueller, Warren S Eller
BACKGROUND: We aimed to determine the incidence of surgical site infection (SSI) after cesarean delivery (CD) and identify the risk factors in a rural population. METHODS: We identified 218 SSI patients by International Classification of Disease codes and matched them with 3131 parturients (control) from the electronic record database in a time-matched retrospective quality assurance analysis. RESULTS AND DISCUSSION: The incidence of SSI after CD was 7...
October 12, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Sunkuk Kwon, Eva M Sevick-Muraca
A local anesthetic, lidocaine, is known to affect cutaneous blood flow when injected into the skin. However, it is unknown if dermal lymphatic function can also be affected. Therefore, we characterized lymphatic function in response to administration of lidocaine with and without epinephrine. Non-invasive near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI) with intradermal injection of indocyanine green (ICG) was used to characterize the lymphatic "pumping" function in mice after subcutaneous injection of 2 % lidocaine with and without 1:100,000 epinephrine or saline...
October 11, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Jung Ju Choi, Hong Soon Kim, Kyung Cheon Lee, Hojin Hur, Youn Yi Jo
BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to assess whether preanesthetic laboratory values can predict in-hospital mortality and morbidity in patients who have undergone burr hole craniostomy due to chronic subdural hematoma. METHODS: From January 2007 to February 2016, the records of 502 consecutive patients who underwent burr hole craniotomy were analyzed. All cases of burr hole craniostomy were fitted with a drain, as required by our institutional protocol. RESULTS: Patients' demographic data and preoperative laboratory values were subjected to logistic regression analysis to predict in-hospital mortality and morbidity after burr hole craniostomy...
October 7, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Sarah E Dodd, Christopher J Jankowski, Amy E Krambeck, Bhargavi Gali
Holmium laser enucleation of prostate (HoLEP) is being performed with increasing frequency as a minimally invasive alternative to transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP) for the surgical management of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). HoLEP offers the advantage of use of normal saline for irrigation, instead of glycine which is utilized in TURP, decreasing the likelihood of fluid absorption and effects on serum electrolytes. We describe a patient who underwent HoLEP for BPH and subsequently developed non-ion gap metabolic acidosis and hemodilution associated with volume overload...
October 6, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Yoshihiro Takasugi, Koichi Futagawa, Tatsuo Konishi, Daisuke Morimoto, Takahiko Okuda
PURPOSE: Most reported cases of nasopharyngeal laceration following impingement during nasotracheal intubation involved tube insertion via the right nostril. We postulated that recesses on the posterior wall of the nasopharynx might be associated with tube impingement. Using multiplanar imaging and clinical statistics, we evaluated whether anatomical variations in the recesses are related to successful intubation via the right nostril. METHODS: Using multiplanar computed tomography (CT) images of 97 patients, we investigated the locations of recesses relative to the mid-sagittal plane, nasal floor plane and posterior end of the nasal septum, and their shapes...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
May-Han Loh, Lyn Li Lean, Bryan Su Wei Ng, Will Ne-Hooi Loh
Cesarean sections under spinal anesthesia are now a daily occurrence in most tertiary hospitals. We report the first published case of inadvertent spinal injection of ondansetron without any neurological sequelae in a patient undergoing elective Cesarean section under spinal anesthesia. She did not experience any permanent neurological sequelae, and also did not exhibit any central neuraxial opioid side effects-nausea, vomiting or pruritus. Vigilance is essential to reduce the risk of wrong route delivery of drugs, especially when presented in very similar-looking 2 mL ampules as in our institution...
September 27, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Hiroyuki Sumikura
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 24, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Yoshiaki Terao, Ushio Higashijima, Tomomi Toyoda, Taiga Ichinomiya, Makoto Fukusaki, Tetsuya Hara
PURPOSE: Sevoflurane is known to prolong the QT interval. This study aimed to determine the effect of the interaction between intravenous anesthetics and sevoflurane on the QT interval. METHODS: The study included 48 patients who underwent lumbar spine surgery. Patients received 3 μg/kg fentanyl and were then randomly allocated to either Group T, in which they received 5 mg/kg thiamylal, or Group P, in which they received 1.5 mg/kg propofol, at 2 min after administration of fentanyl injection for anesthetic induction...
September 21, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Yun-Sic Bang, Young Uk Kim, Dawoon Oh, Eui Yong Shin, Soo Kyoung Park
PURPOSE: Palonosetron has potent and long-acting antiemetic effects for postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV). The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the efficacy of palonosetron when used with total intravenous anesthesia (TIVA) using propofol and remifentanil for the prevention of PONV in patients undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery. METHODS: This prospective double-blind study comprised 100 female American Society of Anesthesiologist physical status I and II patients who were undergoing laparoscopic gynecologic surgery under TIVA...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Yeon-Dong Kim, Seon-Jeong Park, Junho Shim, Hyungtae Kim
The recently introduced pectoral nerve (Pecs) block is a simple alterative to the conventional thoracic paravertebral block or epidural block for breast surgery. It produces excellent analgesia and can be used to provide balanced anesthesia and as a rescue block in cases where performing a neuraxial blockade is not possible. In the thoracic region, a neuraxial blockade is often used to manage zoster-associated pain. However, this can be challenging for physicians due to the increased risk of hemodynamic instability in the upper thoracic level, and comorbid and contraindicated medical conditions such as coagulopathy...
September 20, 2016: Journal of Anesthesia
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"