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Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274659/blown-away
#1
LETTER
Julie A Chilton
This month's Book Forum caught me by surprise. Although I enjoyed reading Carrie Cariello's What Color Is Monday and learned so much about legal and financial issues families have to consider in Caring for Autism, I never expected my response to our featured film, Keep the Change.
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274658/dr-lahti-pulkkinen-et-al-reply
#2
LETTER
Marius Lahti-Pulkkinen, Polina Girchenko, Katri Räikkönen
In their Letter to the Editor, "Antenatal Depression, Epigenetic Gestational Age, Childhood Psychiatric Symptoms, and the Need to Consider the Possible Effects of Unaccounted Confounders," Ghosh et al.1 suggested that unaccounted confounders might explain the associations of child epigenetic gestational age at birth with maternal antenatal depression and child psychiatric problems reported in the article by Suarez et al., "The Epigenetic Clock at Birth: Associations With Maternal Antenatal Depression and Child Psychiatric Problems...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274657/antenatal-depression-epigenetic-gestational-age-childhood-psychiatric-symptoms-and-the-need-to-consider-the-possible-effects-of-unaccounted-confounders
#3
LETTER
Abhishek Ghosh, Swapnajeet Sahoo, Vikas Menon, Harish M Tharayil, Abha Thakurdeshai, Chittaranjan Andrade
Suarez et al.1 examined associations among antenatal depression, epigenetic gestational age (EGA) as a novel biomarker, and early childhood psychiatric problems. They found that greater severity of antenatal depression predicted lower EGA and that lower EGA predicted total and internalizing problems at 3.7 years of age. Although they included many covariates in their analysis, we believe that the value of the study could have been enhanced by the inclusion of potentially important but unaddressed confounders...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274656/drs-walkup-and-cottingham-reply
#4
LETTER
John T Walkup, Elizabeth Cottingham
Thank you to the authors for taking the time to read our editorial "Antipsychotic Induced Weight Gain and Metformin"1 in JAACAP and send in a letter to the editor with comments.
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274655/dr-handen-et-al-reply
#5
LETTER
Benjamin L Handen, Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, Evdokia Anagnostou, Michael G Aman
We thank Dr. Higdon et al. for their interest in our article on metformin and children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) and for providing information about the MOBILITY study (a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI)-funded pragmatic clinical trial to examine the relative effectiveness of metformin plus healthy lifestyle instruction versus healthy lifestyle instruction alone).1 In our October 2017 article,2 we reported the results of a 16-week open-label extension study of a group of 61 children and adolescents with ASD prescribed second-generation antipsychotic medications (SGAs) who previously participated in a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of metformin for management of weight gain...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274654/mobility-for-all
#6
LETTER
Claudine Higdon, Christoph U Correll, Stephen Crystal, Nick Patel, Melissa P DelBello
Substantial numbers of children and adolescents are treated with second-generation antipsychotic medications (SGAs), and the cardiometabolic adverse effects of this medication class have raised concerns.1 In the October 2017 issue of the Journal, Handen et al.2 published a 16-week open-label extension study of youth 6 to 17 years of age with autism spectrum disorder treated with liquid metformin after a 16-week double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical efficacy trial. The acute-phase and open-label extension trials demonstrated that liquid metformin was well tolerated, and significant improvements in body mass index z-scores were observed in the metformin-metformin and placebo-metformin groups...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274653/rethinking-lethality-in-youth-suicide-attempts-first-suicide-attempt-outcomes-in-youth-ages-10-to-24
#7
Alastair J S McKean, Chaitanya P Pabbati, Jennifer R Geske, J Michael Bostwick
OBJECTIVE: Although suicide is the second most frequent cause of death in American youth, suicide research has heretofore been confined to convenience samples that represent neither psychiatric nor general populations and that fail to include individuals dying at their first attempts. These limitations were addressed by assembling a youth cohort followed from the first medically recorded attempt (index attempt [IA]). It was hypothesized this approach would more accurately represent the prevalence of completed suicide after an attempt and underscore lethality based on method...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274652/limbic-intrinsic-connectivity-in-depressed-and-high-risk-youth
#8
Manpreet K Singh, Sara M Leslie, Mary M Packer, Elizabeth F Weisman, Ian H Gotlib
OBJECTIVE: Depression runs in families and has been associated with dysfunctional limbic connectivity. Whether aberrant limbic connectivity is a risk factor for or a consequence of depression is unclear. To examine this question, we compared resting state functional connectivity (RSFC) in youth with depressive disorders (DEP), healthy offspring of parents with depression (DEP-risk), and healthy comparison (HC) youth. METHOD: Magnetic resonance imaging at rest was acquired from 119 youth, aged 8 to 17 years (DEP, n = 41, DEP-risk, n = 39, and HC, n = 39) and analyzed using seed-based RSFC in bilateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), covarying for age, IQ, and sex...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274651/atypical-functional-connectivity-of-amygdala-related-to-reduced-symptom-severity-in-children-with-autism
#9
Inna Fishman, Annika C Linke, Janice Hau, Ruth A Carper, Ralph-Axel Müller
OBJECTIVE: Converging evidence indicates that brain abnormalities in autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) involve atypical network connectivity. Given the central role of social deficits in the ASD phenotype, this investigation examined functional connectivity of the amygdala-a brain structure critically involved in processing of social information-in children and adolescents with ASDs, as well as age-dependent changes and links with clinical symptoms. METHOD: Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) data from 55 participants with ASDs and 50 typically developing (TD) controls, aged 7 to 17 years, were included...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274650/a-risk-calculator-to-predict-the-individual-risk-of-conversion-from-subthreshold-bipolar-symptoms-to-bipolar-disorder-i-or-ii-in-youth
#10
Boris Birmaher, John A Merranko, Tina R Goldstein, Mary Kay Gill, Benjamin I Goldstein, Heather Hower, Shirley Yen, Danella Hafeman, Michael Strober, Rasim S Diler, David Axelson, Neal D Ryan, Martin B Keller
OBJECTIVE: Youth with subthreshold mania are at increased risk of conversion to bipolar disorder (BP) I/II. Predictors for conversion have been published for the group as a whole. However, risk factors are heterogeneous, indicating the need for personalized risk assessment. METHOD: One hundred forty youth with BP not otherwise specified (BP-NOS; 6-17 years old) followed through the Course and Outcome of Bipolar Youth (COBY) study with at least 1 follow-up assessment before conversion to BP-I/II were included...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274649/modifying-the-impact-of-eveningness-chronotype-night-owls-in-youth-a-randomized-controlled-trial
#11
Allison G Harvey, Kerrie Hein, Michael R Dolsen, Lu Dong, Sophia Rabe-Hesketh, Nicole B Gumport, Jennifer Kanady, James K Wyatt, Stephen P Hinshaw, Jennifer S Silk, Rita L Smith, Monique A Thompson, Nancee Zannone, Daniel Jin Blum
OBJECTIVE: To determine whether an intervention to reduce eveningness chronotype improves sleep, circadian, and health (emotional, cognitive, behavioral, social, physical) outcomes. METHOD: Youth aged 10 to 18 years with an evening chronotype and who were "at risk" in 1 of 5 health domains were randomized to: (a) Transdiagnostic Sleep and Circadian Intervention for Youth (TranS-C; n = 89) or (b) Psychoeducation (PE; n = 87) at a university-based clinic...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274648/prevalence-and-characteristics-of-self-harm-in-adolescents-meta-analyses-of-community-based-studies-1990-2015
#12
REVIEW
Donna Gillies, Maria A Christou, Andrew C Dixon, Oliver J Featherston, Iro Rapti, Alicia Garcia-Anguita, Miguel Villasis-Keever, Pratibha Reebye, Evangelos Christou, Nagat Al Kabir, Panagiota A Christou
OBJECTIVE: To provide meta-analytic estimates of self-harm from all community-based studies of adolescents from 1990 through 2015, estimates of suicidal risk, and characteristics including age profile, frequency, types, seeking help, and reasons. METHOD: Databases, bibliographies, and the internet were searched for cross-sectional and cohort studies of 12- to 18-year-olds. Meta-analytic estimates of the prevalence and characteristics of self-harm, risk of suicidal behaviors, and rates comparing different methods were calculated...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274647/youth-suicide-the-first-suicide-attempt
#13
EDITORIAL
Benjamin N Shain
A mainstay in the identification and management of youth at risk for suicide is the use of suicide risk factors, such as past suicide attempt(s), past or current suicidal ideation, mood disorders, substance use disorders, psychosis, male gender, and lack of family support.1 A history of at least 1 medically serious suicide attempt2 or violent self-harm3 is a particularly important risk factor. This phenomenon has been studied mostly with clinical samples, such as cohorts of patients initially admitted to a hospital for an attempt, having used a particular self-harm method, or seen in an emergency department...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274646/brain-markers-of-familial-risk-for-depression-steps-toward-clinical-relevance
#14
EDITORIAL
Danella M Hafeman
An important goal in the field of psychiatry is to identify individuals at risk for major psychopathology, prior to actual onset of disorder. Discovery of risk markers that predict onset of disorder, if they are sensitive and specific, could help in the process of early diagnosis, and ultimately lead to improved early intervention and prevention. This is especially a key aspiration for disorders that take a tremendous toll on health and functioning in both adolescence and adulthood, including depression, bipolar disorder, and schizophrenia...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274645/a-risk-calculator-for-bipolar-disorder-in-youth-improving-the-odds-for-personalized-prevention-and-early-intervention
#15
EDITORIAL
Melissa P DelBello
There have been many longitudinal studies examining biological and environmental risk factors for developing bipolar disorder in youth. Specifically, well-established risk factors for bipolar disorder in children and adolescents include having a family history of bipolar disorder, depression, disruptive behavior disorders, psychosis, antidepressant-induced manic symptoms, anxiety, and subsyndromal symptoms of mania and depression.1 In an effort to identify individuals at highest risk for developing bipolar disorder, several investigators have attempted to characterize a bipolar prodrome...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274644/meeting-the-workforce-shortage-toward-4-year-board-certification-in-child-and-adolescent-psychiatry
#16
EDITORIAL
James C Harris
Child Psychiatry has long been recognized as the medical specialty with the greatest workforce shortage.1 This shortage is of increasing concern because of the high burden of child and adolescent mental illness that is exemplified by the increasing rates of suicide in youth.
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274643/what-s-in-a-name-moving-to-neuroscience-based-nomenclature-in-pediatric-psychopharmacology
#17
EDITORIAL
Ryan S Sultan, Christoph U Correll, Joseph Zohar, Gil Zalsman, Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele
Our traditional names for psychotropic medication classes lead to unnecessary confusion. As clinicians, we have grown comfortable with idiosyncratic names of psychotropic medications and have forgotten how unclear and misleading they can be. For example, evidence shows that serotonin reuptake inhibitors help in pediatric anxiety disorders, but a parent with an anxious child might ask, "If you diagnosed my son with separation anxiety, why are you giving him an antidepressant?" Another parent might object to the use of a "stimulant" medication, "My daughter never slows down, the last thing she needs is a stimulant!" Similarly, an "antipsychotic" can be prescribed on-label to youth with mania, bipolar depression, tics, or irritability in autism but families and patients might be confused by or object to the implied label of being "psychotic...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30274642/think-ask-act-the-intersectionality-of-mental-and-reproductive-health-for-judicially-involved-girls
#18
EDITORIAL
Mikaela A Kelly, Elizabeth Barnert, Eraka Bath
Danielle Smith, a 16-year-old African-American girl newly detained at juvenile hall, presents for psychiatric evaluation. She describes a history of sexual abuse by her foster father and 2 years of commercial sexual exploitation after running away at 14 years of age. Scarcely more than 100 pounds, she endorses drug use, primarily marijuana, and notes prior use of cocaine and methamphetamine, provided by her trafficker (described as her "boyfriend"). She has a timid smile and uses music and journaling as her refuge...
October 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30196879/corrigendum
#19
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
September 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/30196878/the-body-and-the-traumatic-real
#20
LETTER
Craigan Usher
The symbol (word) first manifests itself as the killing of the thing…-Jacques Lacan1 This month our books and reviewers challenge us to examine the mental worlds and lived experience of women whose bodies are brutalized, pushed to extremes of overeating and undereating, of wishing to shout yet being unable to say a word. Nathalie Szilagyi reviews writer and feminist Roxane Gay's Hunger, a memoir detailing the author's struggles with self-acceptance and her body in the aftermath of severe trauma. In her review, Szilgayi asks us to imagine how we can help people facing situations like that of Gay, in ways more affirming and effective...
September 2018: Journal of the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
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