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Current Opinion in Critical Care

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28614095/the-value-of-dynamic-preload-variables-during-spontaneous-ventilation
#1
Azriel Perel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the physiological significance and clinical value of dynamic preload variables in spontaneously breathing patients. RECENT FINDINGS: Dynamic preload variables reflect the response of the cardiac output to a modification of preload and can therefore be used to assess fluid responsiveness. Continuous dynamic parameters that are calculated from the variations in the arterial and plethysmographic waveforms following a mechanical breath have been shown to predict fluid responsiveness much better than static preload parameters...
June 12, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28570301/clinical-examination-for-diagnosing-circulatory-shock
#2
Bart Hiemstra, Ruben J Eck, Frederik Keus, Iwan C C van der Horst
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In the acute setting of circulatory shock, physicians largely depend on clinical examination and basic laboratory values. The daily use of clinical examination for diagnostic purposes contrasts sharp with the limited number of studies. We aim to provide an overview of the diagnostic accuracy of clinical examination in estimating circulatory shock reflected by an inadequate cardiac output (CO). RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies showed poor correlations between CO and mottling, capillary refill time or central-to-peripheral temperature gradients in univariable analyses...
June 7, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28590257/critical-care-ultrasonography-as-complementary-variable-in-the-diagnosis-and-management-of-circulatory-shock
#3
Geert Koster, Iwan C C van der Horst
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The objective was to define the role of ultrasound in the diagnosis and management and the management of circulatory shock by critical appraisal of the literature. RECENT FINDINGS: Assessment of any patient's hemodynamic profile based on clinical examination can be sufficient in several cases, but many times unclarities remain. Arterial catheters and central venous lines are commonly used in critically ill patients for practical reasons, and offer an opportunity for advanced hemodynamic monitoring...
June 3, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28562385/mitochondrial-dna-in-sepsis
#4
John S Harrington, Augustine M K Choi, Kiichi Nakahira
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Our understanding of critical illness is transforming as we develop a better understanding of the impact pathogen-associated molecular patterns and damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) have on the pathogenesis of disease. Of the known DAMPs, there is a growing interest in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) as a DAMP capable of propagating the inflammatory response seen in sepsis and other conditions. In this review, we describe the varying mechanisms by which mtDNA is translocated from mitochondria into cytosol and the extracellular space where it can illicit an inflammatory response...
May 27, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28562384/personalized-hemodynamic-management
#5
Bernd Saugel, Jean-Louis Vincent, Julia Y Wagner
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To describe personalized hemodynamic management of critically ill patients in the operating room and the ICU. RECENT FINDINGS: Several recent clinical studies have investigated different strategies for optimizing blood pressure (BP) and flow in the operating room and in the ICU. In the past, (early) goal-directed hemodynamic treatment strategies often used predefined fixed population-based 'normal' values as hemodynamic targets. Most hemodynamic variables, however, have large interindividual variability and are dependent on several biometric factors...
May 27, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548993/muscle-metabolism
#6
Nicolas Tardif, Jonathan Grip, Olav Rooyackers
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To review the recent findings on metabolic derangements leading to loss of muscle mass and function. RECENT FINDINGS: Several recent studies investigated methods to assess muscle mass and function and its clinical relevance. These are also included. A few studies confirm that a low muscle mass is related to a worse outcome but also a compromised muscle function at discharge is related to long-term survival. A low quality of muscle assessed by the density of muscle from a computed tomography scan is related to mortality...
May 25, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548992/gut-microbiota-and-host-defense-in-critical-illness
#7
Max C Jacobs, Bastiaan W Haak, Floor Hugenholtz, W Joost Wiersinga
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The review aims to discuss emerging evidence in the field of microbiome-dependent roles in host defense during critical illness with a focus on lung, kidney, and brain inflammation. RECENT FINDINGS: The gut microbiota of critical ill patients is characterized by lower diversity, lower abundances of key commensal genera, and in some cases overgrowth by one bacterial genera, a state otherwise known as dysbiosis. Increasing evidence suggests that microbiota-derived components can reach the circulatory system from the gut and modulate immune homeostasis...
May 25, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28548991/protein-nutrition-and-exercise-survival-kit-for-critically-ill
#8
Peter J M Weijs
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Protein delivery as well as exercise of critically ill in clinical practice is still a highly debated issue. Here we discuss only the most recent updates in the literature concerning protein nutrition and exercise of the critically ill. RECENT FINDINGS: By lack of randomized controlled trial (RCTs) in protein nutrition we discuss four post-hoc analyses of nutrition studies and one experimental study in mice. Studies mainly confirm some insights that protein and energy effects are separate and that the trajectory of the patient in the ICU might change these effects...
May 25, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28537998/lactate-and-microcirculation-as-suitable-targets-for-hemodynamic-optimization-in-resuscitation-of-circulatory-shock
#9
Michael E Kiyatkin, Jan Bakker
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: A discussion of recent research exploring the feasibility of perfusion-guided resuscitation of acute circulatory failure with a focus on lactate and microcirculation. RECENT FINDINGS: Upon diagnosis of shock, hyperlactemia is associated with poor outcome and, under appropriate clinical circumstances, may reflect inadequate tissue perfusion. Persistent hyperlactemia despite resuscitation is even more strongly correlated with morbidity and mortality...
May 22, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28537997/where-are-we-heading-with-fluid-responsiveness-research
#10
Simon T Vistisen, Peter Juhl-Olsen
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Fluid responsiveness prediction is not always possible with well established dynamic approaches such as passive leg raising or pulse pressure variation in the ICU. The purpose of the present review is to summarize emerging alternative techniques for fluid responsiveness prediction in adult critically ill patients and discuss their methodology and applicability. In addition, the future role of fluid responsiveness prediction in the ICU is discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: Several new dynamic techniques have been investigated and they all contribute to the applicability of fluid responsiveness techniques...
May 22, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28538248/minimally-invasive-cardiac-output-technologies-in-the-icu-putting-it-all-together
#11
Ramon P Clement, Jaap J Vos, Thomas W L Scheeren
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Haemodynamic monitoring is a cornerstone in the diagnosis and evaluation of treatment in critically ill patients in circulatory distress. The interest in using minimally invasive cardiac output monitors is growing. The purpose of this review is to discuss the currently available devices to provide an overview of their validation studies in order to answer the question whether these devices are ready for implementation in clinical practice. RECENT FINDINGS: Current evidence shows that minimally invasive cardiac output monitoring devices are not yet interchangeable with (trans)pulmonary thermodilution in measuring cardiac output...
May 19, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28509668/norepinephrine-in-septic-shock-when-and-how-much
#12
Olfa Hamzaoui, Thomas W L Scheeren, Jean-Louis Teboul
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Norepinephrine is the first-line agent recommended during resuscitation of septic shock to correct hypotension because of depressed vascular tone. Important clinical issues are the best timing to start norepinephrine, the optimal blood pressure target, and the best therapeutic options to face refractory hypotension of when high doses of norepinephrine are required to reach the target. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent literature has reported benefits of early administration of norepinephrine because of the following reasons: profound and durable hypotension is an independent factor of increased mortality, early administration of norepinephrine increases cardiac output, improves microcirculation and avoid fluid overload...
May 13, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402986/no-small-matter-pediatric-resuscitation
#13
Taylor McCormick, Kevin McVaney, Paul E Pepe
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To present advancements in pediatric cardiac arrest research, highlighting articles most relevant to clinical practice published since the latest international guidelines for cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). RECENT FINDINGS: Clinical trials examining targeted temperature management in children support avoidance of hyperthermia for both pediatric in-hospital cardiac arrest (PIHCA) and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (POHCA), but no statistically significant outcome differences were confirmed comparing 33 and 36 °C in the limited populations studied...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28402985/the-past-present-and-future-of-ventilation-during-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#14
Mary P Chang, Ahamed H Idris
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To evaluate the past and present literature on ventilation during out of hospital cardiac arrest, highlighting research that has informed current guidelines. RECENT FINDINGS: Previous studies have studied what are optimal compression-to-ventilation ratios, ventilation rates, and methods of ventilation. Continuous chest compression cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) has not shown to provide a significant survival benefit over the traditional 30 : 2 CPR...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398910/ebm-vs-ebm-combining-evidence-based-and-experienced-based-medicine-in-resuscitation-research
#15
Paul E Pepe, Tom P Aufderheide
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the clear rationale for evidence-based medicine (EvBM) in the challenging realms of resuscitation research, yet also provide case examples in which even the well designed, multicentered randomized clinical trial may have had unrecognized limitations, and thus misleading results. This is where experienced-based medicine (ExBM) helps to resolve the issue. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent publications have brought to task the conclusions drawn from various clinical trials of resuscitative interventions...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398909/resuscitating-resuscitation-an-overview
#16
Paul E Pepe
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398908/evolution-and-revolution-in-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#17
Ray Fowler, Mary P Chang, Ahamed H Idris
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the evolution of the technique of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR), including presenting important research that has made substantial improvements in patient outcome. RECENT FINDINGS: The last half century has seen the arising of guidelines for performing CPR increasingly based on good scientific evidence. Improvements in the technique, including teaching citizens 'compressions only CPR', have simplified the process of rescue while improving survival...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28398907/cardiopulmonary-monitoring-of-shock
#18
James Simmons, Corey E Ventetuolo
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: We will briefly review the classification of shock and the hallmark features of each subtype. Available modalities for monitoring shock patients will be discussed, along with evidence supporting the use, common pitfalls, and practical considerations of each method. RECENT FINDINGS: As older, invasive monitoring methods such as the pulmonary artery catheter have fallen out of favor, newer technologies for cardiac output estimation, echocardiography, and noninvasive tests such as passive leg raising have gained popularity...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28383297/supportive-technology-in-the-resuscitation-of-out-of-hospital-cardiac-arrest-patients
#19
Scott T Youngquist, Kenneth A Scheppke, Paul E Pepe
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To discuss the increasing value of technological tools to assess and augment the quality of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) and, in turn, improve chances of surviving out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). RECENT FINDINGS: After decades of disappointing survival rates, various emergency medical services systems worldwide are now seeing a steady rise in OHCA survival rates guided by newly identified 'sweet spots' for chest compression rate and chest compression depth, aided by monitoring for unnecessary pauses in chest compressions as well as methods to better ensure full-chest recoil after compressions...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28379867/metrics-save-lives-value-and-hurdles-faced
#20
Jeffrey M Goodloe, Ahamed H Idris
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Affirmation of the importance of precision in fundamentals of resuscitation practices with improving neurologically intact survival from sudden cardiac arrest, correlated with both measurements of resuscitation metrics generically and recently further refined metric parameters specifically. RECENT FINDINGS: Quality of baseline cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) in historic intervention trials may not be 'high quality' as once assumed. Optimal chest compression rates are within the narrow spectrum of 106-108/min for adults...
June 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
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