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Current Opinion in Critical Care

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207602/spreading-depolarization-monitoring-in-neurocritical-care-of-acute-brain-injury
#1
Jed A Hartings
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Spreading depolarizations are unique in being discrete pathologic entities that are well characterized experimentally and also occur commonly in patients with substantial acute brain injury. Here, we review essential concepts in depolarization monitoring, highlighting its clinical significance, interpretation, and future potential. RECENT FINDINGS: Cortical lesion development in diverse animal models is mediated by tissue waves of mass spreading depolarization that cause the toxic loss of ion homeostasis and limit energy substrate supply through associated vasoconstriction...
February 14, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207601/advanced-monitoring-in-traumatic-brain-injury-microdialysis
#2
Keri L H Carpenter, Adam M H Young, Peter J Hutchinson
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Here, we review the present state-of-the-art of microdialysis for monitoring patients with severe traumatic brain injury, highlighting the newest developments. Microdialysis has evolved in neurocritical care to become an established bedside monitoring modality that can reveal unique information on brain chemistry. RECENT FINDINGS: A major advance is recent consensus guidelines for microdialysis use and interpretation. Other advances include insight obtained from microdialysis into the complex, interlinked traumatic brain injury disorders of electrophysiological changes, white matter injury, inflammation and metabolism...
February 14, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28207600/advancements-in-the-critical-care-management-of-status-epilepticus
#3
Andrew Bauerschmidt, Andrew Martin, Jan Claassen
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Status epilepticus has a high morbidity and mortality. There are little definitive data to guide management; however, new recent data continue to improve understanding of management options of status epilepticus. This review examines recent advancements regarding the critical care management of status epilepticus. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies support the initial treatment of status epilepticus with early and aggressive benzodiazepine dosing...
February 14, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169858/central-nervous-system-infections-in-immunocompromised-patients
#4
Romain Sonneville, Eric Magalhaes, Geert Meyfroidt
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Although rare, central nervous system (CNS) infections are increasingly being recognized in immunocompromised patients. The goal of the present review is to provide a practical diagnostic approach for the intensivist, and to briefly discuss some of the most prevalent conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: Immunocompromised patients presenting with new neurological symptoms should always be suspected of a CNS infection. These infections carry a poor prognosis, especially if intracranial hypertension, severely altered mental status or seizures are present...
February 4, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169857/intersection-of-prognosis-and-palliation-in-neurocritical-care
#5
Michael Rubin, Jordan Bonomo, J Claude Hemphill
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Difficult discussions regarding end-of-life care are common in neurocritical care. Because of a patient's neurological impairment, decisions regarding continuing or limiting aggressive care must often be made by patients' families in conjunction with medical providers. This review provides perspective on three major aspects of this circumstance: prognostication, family-physician discussions, and determination of death (specifically as it impacts on organ donation). RECENT FINDINGS: Numerous studies have now demonstrated that prediction models developed from populations of brain-injured patients may be misleading when applied to individual patients...
February 4, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28169856/postinterventional-critical-care-management-of-aneurysmal-subarachnoid-hemorrhage
#6
Sudhir Datar, Alejandro A Rabinstein
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Subarachnoid hemorrhage from a ruptured aneurysm (aSAH) is a complex disorder with the potential to have devastating effects on the brain as well as other organ systems. After more than 3 decades of research, the underlying pathophysiologic mechanisms remain incompletely understood and important questions remain regarding the evaluation and management of these patients. The purpose of this review is to analyze the recent literature and improve our understanding of certain key clinical aspects...
February 4, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157822/intracranial-pressure-management-in-patients-with-traumatic-brain-injury-an-update
#7
Nino Stocchetti, Tommaso Zoerle, Marco Carbonara
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and treatment is central in the management of traumatic brain injury. Despite 4 decades of clinical use, several aspects remain controversial, including the indications for ICP and treatment options. RECENT FINDINGS: Two major trials tested surgical decompression and mild hypothermia as treatments for high ICP. Both were rigorous, randomized, multicenter studies, with different designs. Decompression was tested for ICP refractory to conventional treatment, whereas hypothermia was offered as an alternative to conventional medical therapy...
February 2, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157821/blood-pressure-control-for-acute-severe-ischemic-and-hemorrhagic-stroke
#8
Julian Bösel
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Severe ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke is a devastating cerebrovascular disease often demanding critical care. Optimal management of blood pressure (BP) in the acute phase is controversial. The purpose of this review is to display insights from recent studies on BP control in both conditions. RECENT FINDINGS: BP control in acute ischemic stroke has recently been investigated with regard to endovascular recanalizing therapies. Decreases from baseline BP and hypotension during the intervention have been found detrimental...
February 2, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28157820/high-frequency-oscillatory-ventilation-still-a-role
#9
Jensen Ng, Niall D Ferguson
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: In light of emerging data from clinical trials, the place of high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) in the management of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is uncertain. This review provides an overview of these new clinical data and also explores new areas of investigation for HFOV in adults. RECENT FINDINGS: While prior meta-analyses suggested benefit for HFOV, updated systematic reviews published this year, which include two large recent clinical trials, now show no statistically significant impact of HFOV on mortality in adults with ARDS...
February 2, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28107224/abdominal-sepsis
#10
Quirine J J Boldingh, Fleur E E de Vries, Marja A Boermeester
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the recent evidence on the treatment of abdominal sepsis with a specific emphasis on the surgical treatment. RECENT FINDINGS: A multitude of surgical approaches towards abdominal sepsis are practised. Recent evidence shows that immediate closure of the abdomen has a better outcome. A short course of antibiotics has a similar effect as a long course of antibiotics in patients with intra-abdominal infection without severe sepsis. SUMMARY: Management of abdominal sepsis requires a multidisciplinary approach...
February 2, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28107225/the-gut-microbiome-takes-center-stage-in-critical-care
#11
W Joost Wiersinga
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 19, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092310/new-insights-into-the-gut-as-the-driver-of-critical-illness-and-organ-failure
#12
Mei Meng, Nathan J Klingensmith, Craig M Coopersmith
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The gut has long been hypothesized to be the 'motor' of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. This review serves as an update on new data elucidating the role of the gut as the propagator of organ failure in critical illness. RECENT FINDINGS: Under basal conditions, the gut absorbs nutrients and serves as a barrier that prevents approximately 40 trillion intraluminal microbes and their products from causing host injury. However, in critical illness, gut integrity is disrupted with hyperpermeability and increased epithelial apoptosis, allowing contamination of extraluminal sites that are ordinarily sterile...
January 13, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28092309/microbiota-targeted-therapies-on-the-intensive-care-unit
#13
Bastiaan W Haak, Marcel Levi, W Joost Wiersinga
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The composition and diversity of the microbiota of the human gut, skin, and several other sites is severely deranged in critically ill patients on the ICU, and it is likely that these disruptions can negatively affect outcome. We here review new and ongoing studies that investigate the use of microbiota-targeted therapeutics in the ICU, and provide recommendations for future research. RECENT FINDINGS: Practically every intervention in the ICU as well as the physiological effects of critical illness itself can have a profound impact on the gut microbiota...
January 13, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28079708/parenteral-nutrition-in-the-critically-ill
#14
Jan Gunst, Greet Van den Berghe
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Feeding guidelines have recommended early, full nutritional support in critically ill patients to prevent hypercatabolism and muscle weakness. Early enteral nutrition was suggested to be superior to early parenteral nutrition. When enteral nutrition fails to meet nutritional target, it was recommended to administer supplemental parenteral nutrition, albeit with a varying starting point. Sufficient amounts of amino acids were recommended, with addition of glutamine in subgroups...
January 11, 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27941356/abdominal-compartment-syndrome-and-the-open-abdomen-any-unresolved-issues
#15
Michael Sugrue
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This article reviews the key principles of abdominal compartment syndrome and the open abdomen, exploring some of the unresolved issues. It reviews new concepts in care. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent use of peritoneal resuscitation, and benefits of mesh-mediated traction are discussed. Abdominal compartment syndrome remains a result of complex interaction between general haemorrhage, sepsis and fluid resuscitation. Improved resuscitation and sepsis control has decreased but not abolished the need for the open abdomen and progression for abdominal compartment syndrome...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27922846/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-in-another-50-years-historical-footnote-or-persistent-malady
#16
B Taylor Thompson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27922845/continued-under-recognition-of-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-after-the-berlin-definition-what-is-the-solution
#17
John G Laffey, Tài Pham, Giacomo Bellani
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Timely recognition of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may allow for more prompt management and less exacerbation of lung injury. However, the absence of a diagnostic test for ARDS means that the diagnosis of ARDS requires clinician recognition in what is usually a complicated and evolving illness. We review data concerning the extent of recognition of ARDS in the era of the Berlin definition of ARDS. RECENT FINDINGS: ARDS continues to be under-recognized - even in the era of the more recent 'Berlin' definition, and significant delay in its recognition is common...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906709/looking-closer-at-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-the-role-of-advanced-imaging-techniques
#18
Giacomo Bellani, Jean-Jaques Rouby, Jean-Michel Constantin, Antonio Pesenti
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Advanced imaging techniques have provided invaluable insights in understanding of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) and the effect of therapeutic strategies, thanks to the possibility of gaining regional information and moving from simple 'anatomical' information to in-vivo functional imaging. RECENT FINDINGS: Computed tomography (CT) led to the understanding of several ARDS mechanisms and interaction with mechanical ventilation. It is nowadays frequently part of routine diagnostic workup, often leading to treatment changes...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27906708/acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-mimics-the-role-of-lung-biopsy
#19
Mylène Aublanc, Sophie Perinel, Claude Guérin
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) mimics is a condition looking like ARDS but that does not fulfill every criterion according to the recent Berlin definition. The purpose of this review is to better delineate ARDS mimics, to discuss why the complete diagnosis of ARDS is important, and to make a brief overview on the role of open lung biopsy in this setting. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent autopsy and lung biopsy data from ARDS patients compared lung histologic findings with the new Berlin definition of ARDS...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27898439/limiting-sedation-for-patients-with-acute-respiratory-distress-syndrome-time-to-wake-up
#20
Faraaz Ali Shah, Timothy D Girard, Sachin Yende
PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Critically ill patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) may require sedation in their clinical care. The goals of sedation in ARDS patients are to improve patient comfort and tolerance of supportive and therapeutic measures without contributing to adverse outcomes. This review discusses the current evidence for sedation management in patients with ARDS. RECENT FINDINGS: Deep sedation strategies should be avoided in the care of patients with ARDS because deep sedation has been associated with increased time on mechanical ventilation, longer ICU and hospital length of stay, and higher mortality in critically ill patients...
February 2017: Current Opinion in Critical Care
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