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Clinics in Sports Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314424/foreword
#1
EDITORIAL
Mark D Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314423/dental-and-orofacial-injuries
#2
REVIEW
Paul Piccininni, Anthony Clough, Ray Padilla, Gabriella Piccininni
Oral and facial injuries are very common in sport, and can be very expensive to treat. Many of these injuries are preventable with proper pre-competition assessment and suitable well-designed protection. Prompt sideline identification and management of orofacial injuries and appropriate follow-up are crucial to successful outcomes. There have been significant recent advances in both trauma management and mouth guard design and fabrication techniques. Athletes have a unique set of challenges-including collisions, finances, travel and training, dehydration, sport beverages, and high carbohydrate diets-that may compromise their oral health...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314422/maxillofacial-and-mandibular-fractures-in-sports
#3
REVIEW
Christopher F Viozzi
Sports account for 3% to 29% of facial injuries and 10% to 42% of facial fractures. Fractures of the facial skeleton most commonly occur owing to interpersonal violence or motor vehicle crashes. Facial fractures from sporting activities has clearly decreased over time owing to better preventive measures. However, this decreasing trend is offset by the emergence of more dangerous sports activities, or "pushing the envelope" of traditional sports activities. Fractures can occur from contact between athletes, and between athletes and their surroundings...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314421/nasal-injuries-in-sports
#4
REVIEW
Alexander P Marston, Erin K O'Brien, Grant S Hamilton
Nasal trauma is a common consequence of athletic competition. The nasal bones are the most commonly fractured facial bone and are particularly at risk during sports participation. Acute management of trauma to the nose includes thorough evaluation of all injuries and may require immediate management for repair of facial lacerations, epistaxis control, or septal hematoma drainage. Nasal fractures can often be addressed with closed reduction techniques; however, in the setting of complex nasal trauma, an open approach may be indicated...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314420/sport-injuries-of-the-ear-and-temporal-bone
#5
REVIEW
L Mariel Osetinsky, Grant S Hamilton, Matthew L Carlson
In cases of head trauma, the ear should be evaluated in all of its components. A good understanding of otologic and skull base anatomy enables a thorough trauma assessment of this complex anatomic region. Auricular laceration, abrasion, avulsion, hematoma, frostbite, otitis externa, exostosis, tympanic membrane perforation, ossicular discontinuity, perilymphatic fistula, labyrinthine concussion, temporal bone fracture, facial nerve paresis, and sensorineural hearing loss are a few of the more common otologic injuries seen in active patients...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314419/eye-and-orbital-injuries-in-sports
#6
REVIEW
Jonathan A Micieli, Michael Easterbrook
Sports-related eye and orbital injuries continue to occur regularly and may have serious consequences. They are completely preventable when appropriate protection is worn, particularly with polycarbonate lenses. Eye protection is available for most sports and should be worn in accordance with the standards of regional authorities. It is important for first responders to identify red flags in the history and physical examination of an injured athlete for urgent referral to an ophthalmologist. Common sports-related eye injuries include corneal abrasion, subconjunctival hemorrhage, hyphema, vitreous hemorrhage, retinal tears and detachment...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314418/facial-injuries-in-sports-soft-tissue-injuries-abrasions-contusions-lacerations
#7
REVIEW
Guy L Lanzi
This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of facial soft tissue injuries in athletics. General diagnostic algorithms are presented, including initial assessment aligned with Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines. Specific injury types are discussed along with possible collateral damage and adverse sequelae to limit morbidity. Treatment modalities are described using generally accepted principles refined to fit athlete patients. Return-to-play issues are outlined relative to level of participation, with the emphasis on safe return...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314417/an-algorithmic-approach-to-triaging-facial-trauma-on-the-sidelines
#8
REVIEW
Kristi Colbenson
On-the-field evaluation of facial trauma requires a focused initial assessment of the patient's airway and breathing with a knowledge of the critical associated injuries. The initial triage in facial trauma involves assessing and protecting the athlete's airway, breathing, and cervical spine. The algorithm then requires a repeat evaluation for subtle causes of airway obstruction and aspiration risks. Final steps include control of hemorrhage, recognition of neurologic and ophthalmologic disability, and complete exposure of the athlete to examine for other associated injury...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314416/prevention-of-sport-related-facial-injuries
#9
REVIEW
Amanda M Black, Declan A Patton, Paul H Eliason, Carolyn A Emery
There is evidence that eye protection, mouth guards, helmets, and face guards are effective in reducing the risk of facial injury; however, such safety practices are not adopted universally by all athletes playing high-risk sports. Underlying beliefs about risk perception, comfort, ineffectiveness, utility, and a lack of awareness or enforcement have been identified as reasons people may not adopt preventive measures. There are several high-risk sports that have not mandated or do not enforce use of protective equipment...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28314415/epidemiology-of-facial-injuries-in-sport
#10
REVIEW
Amanda M Black, Paul H Eliason, Declan A Patton, Carolyn A Emery
Facial injuries can pose a large health burden for athletes, potentially resulting in time loss and surgery. This article reviews the incidence, common mechanisms, and risk factors of facial injuries in several sports globally. Estimates of facial injury rates are complicated by a lack of, or inconsistent, reporting on specific types of injury. Much of the epidemiologic literature is based on hospital-based injury surveillance and there is a paucity of literature examining sport-specific risk factors. Future research should focus on prospective injury surveillance methodologies with consistent injury definitions examining risk factors and the effectiveness of facial injury prevention efforts...
April 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871666/management-of-the-anterior-cruciate-ligament-deficient-knee
#11
EDITORIAL
Darren L Johnson
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871665/anterior-cruciate-ligament
#12
EDITORIAL
Mark D Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871664/gross-arthroscopic-and-radiographic-anatomies-of-the-anterior-cruciate-ligament-foundations-for-anterior-cruciate-ligament-surgery
#13
REVIEW
Sebastián Irarrázaval, Marcio Albers, Tom Chao, Freddie H Fu
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the more studied structures in the knee joint. It is not a tubular structure, but is much narrower in its midsubstance and broader at its ends, producing an hourglass shape. The ACL is composed of 2 functional bundles, the anteromedial and posterolateral bundles, that are named for their location of insertion on the anterior surface of the tibial plateau. Although the relative contribution in terms of total cross-sectional area of the ACL has been noted to be equal in regards to each bundle, dynamically these bundles demonstrate different properties for knee function...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871663/surgical-management-and-treatment-of-the-anterior-cruciate-ligament-medial-collateral-ligament-injured-knee
#14
REVIEW
Kevin M Dale, James R Bailey, Claude T Moorman
The medial collateral ligament (MCL) is the most commonly injured ligament of the knee. The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is the most commonly injured ligament in conjunction with the MCL. Most MCL injuries can be treated nonoperatively, whereas the ACL often requires reconstruction. A good physical examination is essential for diagnosis, whereas radiographs and MRI of the knee confirm diagnosis and help guide treatment planning. Preoperative physical therapy should be completed before surgical management to allow for return of knee range of motion and an attempt at MCL healing...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871662/indications-for-two-incision-outside-in-anterior-cruciate-ligament-reconstruction
#15
REVIEW
Barton R Branam, Christopher J Utz
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a commonly performed procedure. Drilling the femoral tunnel independent of the tibial tunnel has become popular as surgeons strive to create tunnels in the anatomic locations of the femoral and tibial attachments of the native ligament. The 2-incision technique effectively and reproducibly accomplishes this goal. The 2-incision technique for ACL reconstruction is a valuable tool in the skillset of the reconstructive knee surgeon. Indications for the 2-incision surgery are reviewed in detail...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871661/single-bundle-anatomic-anterior-cruciate-ligament-reconstruction-surgical-technique-pearls-and-pitfalls
#16
REVIEW
Chaitu S Malempati, Adam V Metzler, Darren L Johnson
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) ruptures are some of the most common sports-related injuries. Treatment of these injuries with ACL reconstruction has evolved over the last several decades. Anatomic single-bundle ACL reconstruction offers an accurate and reproducible method to reproduce native knee anatomy, restore knee kinematics, and ultimately restore function and decrease long-term degenerative effects. The importance of adequate arthroscopic visualization and a thorough understanding of the native anatomic ACL landmarks are discussed in this article...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871660/management-of-the-anterior-cruciate-ligament-injured-knee-in-the-skeletally-immature-athlete
#17
REVIEW
Christian N Anderson, Allen F Anderson
Intrasubstance tears of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) are being diagnosed with increasing frequency in the skeletally immature. Management options include nonoperative/ early surgical, or delayed surgical reconstruction. Nonoperative/delayed reconstruction results in worse functional outcomes than early reconstruction. Physicians are faced with a treatment dilemma; clinical and basic science studies have demonstrated risk of limb-length discrepancy and angular deformity with ACL reconstruction. Vertical drill tunnels decrease physeal damage and minimize growth deformity; however, this technique results in nonanatomic ACL graft placement...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871659/graft-selection-in-anterior-cruciate-ligament-surgery-who-gets-what-and-why
#18
REVIEW
Kyle R Duchman, T Sean Lynch, Kurt P Spindler
Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are common and affect a young, active patient population. Despite much research, ACL reconstruction graft choice remains a topic of debate. Based on the best available evidence, autograft seems to be superior to allograft for ACL reconstruction in young, active patients. Future high-level studies are required in order to better define the role of allograft in ACL reconstruction. As graft choice is often influenced by surgeon preference, it is important that surgeons understand the current literature as well as the goals of their patients...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871658/rehabilitation-principles-of-the-anterior-cruciate-ligament-reconstructed-knee-twelve-steps-for-successful-progression-and-return-to-play
#19
REVIEW
Kevin E Wilk, Christopher A Arrigo
The rehabilitation process begins immediately after injury to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL). The goal of preoperative rehabilitation is to prepare the patient for surgery. Current rehabilitation programs focus on strengthening exercises and proprioceptive and neuromuscular control drills to provide a neurologic stimulus. It is also important to address preexisting factors, especially for the female athlete, that may predispose to future injury, such as hip and hamstring weakness. Our goal in the rehabilitation program is to restore full, unrestricted function and to assist the patient to return to 100% of the preinjury level while achieving excellent long-term outcomes...
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/27871657/surgical-pearls-in-revision-anterior-cruciate-ligament-surgery-when-must-i-stage
#20
REVIEW
Dustin L Richter, Brian C Werner, Mark D Miller
Failed anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is a challenging clinical entity and revision ACL reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure. This article reviews the etiology of ACL failures, the need for appropriate examination and imaging studies, and discusses the technical considerations to allow for a successful revision reconstruction. Furthermore, we elaborate on the decision-making process of when a 2-stage revision is preferred to a single-stage revision.
January 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
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