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Clinics in Sports Medicine

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886827/the-female-athlete
#1
EDITORIAL
Siobhan M Statuta
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886826/foreword
#2
EDITORIAL
Mark D Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886825/exercise-in-pregnancy
#3
REVIEW
Vanessa H Gregg, James E Ferguson
Routine exercise should be recommended to healthy pregnant women after consultation with an obstetric provider. Even pregnant women who have not been exercising regularly can gradually increase their exercise during pregnancy. Regular exercise during pregnancy promotes overall wellness and helps maintain appropriate gestational weight gain and appropriate fetal weight gain. Exercise in pregnancy may also reduce hypertensive disorders of pregnancy and gestational diabetes, and may be associated with shorter first stage of labor and decreased risk for cesarean section...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886824/sport-concussion-and-the-female-athlete
#4
REVIEW
Jacob E Resch, Amanda Rach, Samuel Walton, Donna K Broshek
Sport concussion (SC) has emerged as a major health concern in the medical community and general public owing to increased research and media attention, which has primarily focused on male athletes. Female athletes have an equal, if not increased, susceptibility to SC. An ever-growing body of research continues to compare male and female athletes in terms of SC before and after an injury. Clinicians must be cognizant of this literature to make evidence-based clinical decision when providing care to female athletes and discern between dated and/or unsupported claims in terms of SC...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886823/update-on-anterior-cruciate-ligament-rupture-and-care-in-the-female-athlete
#5
REVIEW
Jeremy M Burnham, Vonda Wright
As female athlete sports participation has continued to increase, the rate of anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture in female athletes has also increased. Individualized, patient-specific treatment is crucial to achieving optimal outcomes; ACL reconstruction must accurately restore native ACL anatomy and address any concomitant injury to secondary stabilizers. Rehabilitation programs should target hip, core, and trunk neuromuscular control; allow adequate time for graft ligamentization; and address the psychosocial needs of the athlete...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886822/osteopenia-and-osteoporosis-in-female-athletes
#6
REVIEW
John M MacKnight
Disorders of bone density are especially prevalent among athletic women. The severity of bone loss ranges from osteopenia to frank osteoporosis. In female athletes, a higher incidence of osteoporosis is due to a decreased rate of bone accretion in youth, often as a result of hormonal deficiency and/or excessive exercise. Low bone mass poses a particular challenge for athletes because it predisposes to stress-related bone injuries and increases the risk of osteoporosis and insufficiency fractures with aging...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886821/female-athlete-triad-future-directions-for-energy-availability-and-eating-disorder-research-and-practice
#7
REVIEW
Nancy I Williams, Siobhan M Statuta, Ashley Austin
Despite more than 3 decades of research on the Female Athlete Triad, research gaps remain. Although low energy availability (EA) is the key etiologic factor in the Triad and the pathways to low EA are varied, its effects can be modified by several factors. Accurate screening, diagnosis, and treatment of disordered eating are a challenge; however, recent techniques combined with novel educational and behavior interventions prove promising. Recently published practice-based guidelines have helped to translate Triad science and should improve as they are refined...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886820/gastrointestinal-conditions-in-the-female-athlete
#8
REVIEW
Barry Kent Diduch
Exercise can have significant effects on gastrointestinal diseases. Regular, moderate exercise can impart beneficial effects for the intestinal microbiome, irritable bowel syndrome symptoms, and inflammatory bowel disease. High-intensity training or prolonged endurance training, on the other hand, can have negative effects on these same entities. Female athletes report a higher prevalence of irritable bowel syndrome and celiac disease, and furthermore, have gastrointestinal symptoms modulated by the menstrual cycle...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886819/nutritional-aspects-of-the-female-athlete
#9
REVIEW
Kelly A Rossi
Athletes have specific needs based on sex, size, sport, exercise intensity, duration of activity, phase of training, and the season in which the sport is played. Nutritionally, the female athlete is unique, with needs that may vary based on hormonal fluctuations related to the menstrual cycle. This article provides an overview of the distinct nutritional needs and concerns of the physically active female, including energy availability, macronutrient needs, micronutrient needs, hydration, supplements, and other nutritional issues...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886818/cardiovascular-considerations-in-the-female-athlete
#10
REVIEW
Shelby C White, Jana M Goldberg, Robert W Battle
Over several decades, much has been learned about the diverse physical impacts of exercise. Those who excel, such as elite athletes, have physiologic differences compared with the general population. There is a growing body of data suggesting that gender may play a role in these adaptations. Further, certain cardiac conditions may exhibit a gender predilection. This article explains the particular cardiac nuances of the female athlete.
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28886817/women-in-sport-historical-perspectives
#11
REVIEW
Elizabeth A Gregg, Vanessa H Gregg
The history of women in sport in America was shaped by Victorian ideals and other belief systems prevalent during the nineteenth century. Medical experts of that era believed that intense exercise and competition could cause women to become masculine, threaten their ability to bear children, and create other reproductive health complications. Consequently, sport for women was reserved for upper-class women until the mid-twentieth century. Title IX of the Education Amendments had a significant and lasting impact on sport in America...
October 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577716/articular-cartilage-the-search-for-the-holy-grail-of-treatment-and-restoration
#12
EDITORIAL
Eric C McCarty
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577715/articular-cartilage
#13
EDITORIAL
Mark D Miller
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577714/the-early-osteoarthritic-knee-implications-for-cartilage-repair
#14
REVIEW
Chaitu Malempati, Cale A Jacobs, Christian Lattermann
Patients with early osteoarthritis (OA) have been reported to have inferior outcomes with an increased prevalence of early failure after cartilage procedures. The underlying reasons for this failure are likely multifactorial, including a chronic synovial and chondrogenic process, which is confounded by persistent muscle weakness and altered pain processing for those with increased preoperative symptom duration. Pain, radiographic changes, patient-reported outcomes, and macroscopic changes on arthroscopic evaluation or MRI can assist clinicians in identifying the early OA knee to both aid in clinical decision making and create realistic postoperative expectations for patients...
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577713/a-critical-review-management-and-surgical-options-for-articular-defects-in-the-hip
#15
REVIEW
Eric C Makhni, Austin V Stone, Gift C Ukwuani, William Zuke, Tigran Garabekyan, Omer Mei-Dan, Shane J Nho
Patients with articular cartilage lesions of the hip may present with pain and symptoms that may be vague in nature and onset. Therefore, a thorough history and physical examination should be performed for every patient presenting with hip pain and/or disability. The management may be operative or nonoperative. Nonoperative management includes a trial of rest and/or activity modification, along with anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, and biologic injections. Operative treatment in the form of arthroscopic techniques continues to decrease morbidity and offer innovative solutions and new applications for microfracture, ACT, and AMIC...
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577712/management-and-surgical-options-for-articular-defects-in-the-shoulder
#16
REVIEW
Bryan M Saltzman, Timothy Leroux, Brian J Cole
Isolated, full-thickness chondral lesions of the glenohumeral joint are a significant pathology encountered by laborers, athletes, and the elderly. A thorough history should be obtained in any patient presenting to the office with shoulder pain and concern for the etiology being an articular cartilage defect. The first-line imaging should include plain radiographs of the glenohumeral joint; MRI and CT can be ordered as necessary to provide greater detail. Typically, the initial treatment of glenohumeral chondral disease is nonsurgical; however, many surgical treatment options have been refined to provide pain relief, create reparative tissue, or restore the articular surface...
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577711/autologous-chondrocytes-and-next-generation-matrix-based-autologous-chondrocyte-implantation
#17
REVIEW
Betina B Hinckel, Andreas H Gomoll
Focal chondral defects of the knee are common and can significantly impair quality of life. The autologous chondrocyte implantation technique has evolved over the past 20 years; the newest third-generation technique is matrix-induced autologous chondrocyte implantation. Physical examination is important to characterize location and source of pain and identify associated injuries. Imaging studies allow characterization of the lesions, identification of associated lesions, and alignment. Conservative measures should be exhausted before proceeding with surgical treatment...
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577710/allografts-osteochondral-shell-and-paste
#18
REVIEW
Frank B Wydra, Philip J York, Armando F Vidal
There is an increasing need for articular cartilage restoration procedures. Hyaline cartilage lacks intrinsic healing capacity. Persistent osteochondral defects can lead to early and rapid degenerative changes. Microfracture and autologous chondrocyte implantation provide reasonable outcomes for smaller defects without bone loss. However, these techniques have limited effectiveness for lesions greater than 4 cm(2) or with significant bony involvement. Ostochondral allografts provide an option for these lesions...
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577709/microfracture-and-microfracture-plus
#19
REVIEW
Jay C Albright, Ariel Kiyomi Daoud
Articular cartilage damage remains a significant cause for early osteoarthritis in adolescents and young adults. After chondroplasty alone, the mainstay procedure for cartilage injuries is microfracture. Although in small lesions this may be successful long-term, positive results of treating larger lesions this way are less certain. This inconsistency in outcomes has led to augmentation of these defects with scaffolding for autograft regeneration or for allograft cartilage to fill the defect with a hyaline cartilage...
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28577708/osteochondral-autologous-transplantation
#20
REVIEW
Seth L Sherman, Emil Thyssen, Clayton W Nuelle
Osteochondral autologous transplantation (OAT) is a treatment strategy for small and medium sized focal articular cartilage defects in the knee. This article reviews the indications, surgical techniques, outcomes, and limitations of OAT for the management of symptomatic chondral and osteochondral lesions in the knee joint.
July 2017: Clinics in Sports Medicine
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