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Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology

Andreea A Creanga
This article provides a review of maternal mortality data and their limitations in the United States. National maternal mortality data, which rely heavily on vital statistics, document that the risk of death from pregnancy-related causes has not declined for >25 years and that striking racial disparities persist. State-based maternal mortality reviews, functional in many states, obtain detailed information on medical and nonmedical factors contributing to maternal deaths. Without this detailed knowledge from state-level data and without addressing recognized quality problems with vital statistics data at the national-level, we will have difficulty understanding maternal death trends and preventing future such deaths...
March 20, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Shari I Lusskin, Sabrina J Khan, Carrie Ernst, Sally Habib, Madeleine E Fersh, Elizabeth S Albertini
Perinatal depression is associated with serious risks for the mother, baby, and family. When considering treating perinatal depression with a drug indicated for the treatment of depression, the major concerns are whether the drug increases the risks of teratogenicity, pregnancy complications, poor neonatal adaptation, or neurodevelopmental disorders. Although different studies have produced different results, the majority have not shown increases in risk for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors, tricyclic antidepressants, or the noradrenergic/dopaminergic drug bupropion...
March 20, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Tiffany A Moore Simas, Michael P Flynn, Aimee R Kroll-Desrosiers, Stephanie M Carvalho, Leonard L Levin, Kathleen Biebel, Nancy Byatt
This systematic review searched 4 databases (PubMed/MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, and PsychINFO) and identified 21 articles eligible to evaluate the extent to which interventions that integrate depression care into outpatient obstetric practice are feasible, effective, acceptable, and sustainable. Despite limitations among the available studies including marked heterogeneity, there is evidence supporting feasibility, effectiveness, and acceptability. In general, this is an emerging field with promise that requires additional research...
March 16, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Tamara Barghouthi, Cheryl Bushnell
Stroke risk is 3 times higher in pregnancy than in the general young adult population and carries high morbidity and mortality risks. The recognition of signs and symptoms of stroke and other serious cerebrovascular disorders in pregnant and postpartum patients is important for the obstetrician to be able to initiate urgent evaluation and management. The objective of this review is to provide an evidence-based summary of stroke incidence, risk factors, prevention, and treatment of stroke in pregnancy. The impact of postpartum contraceptive use can on stroke risk is summarized...
March 14, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Beverly Gray, Serina Floyd, Andra H James
Managing contraception for women at high risk for thrombosis poses unique challenges. Combined estrogen and progestin contraceptives increase the risk of both venous and arterial thrombosis. They are contraindicated in women with a history of thrombosis and in other women at high risk for thrombosis. However, progestin-only contraceptives are generally considered safe in this patient population. This paper reviews the evidence linking hormonal contraception and clotting risk, outlines appropriate contraceptive methods for women at high risk for thrombosis, discusses surgical risk for sterilization in the setting of current or past thrombosis, and includes a review of the safety of hormonal methods for women who are fully anticoagulated...
March 8, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Elliott K Main
State Perinatal Quality Collaboratives (PQCs) represent a major advance for scaling up quality improvement efforts for reducing maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity. The critical roles of partners, rapid-cycle low-burden data systems, and linkage to maternal mortality review committees are reviewed. The choice of measures is also explored. California's experience with its PQC, data center, quality improvement efforts, and promising results for reduction of maternal mortality and morbidity from hemorrhage are presented...
March 2, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Jeanne Mahoney
The Alliance for Innovation in Maternal Health is a program supported by the Health Services Resource Administration to reduce maternal mortality and severe maternal morbidity in the United States. This program develops bundles of evidence based action steps for birth facilities to adapt. Progress is monitored at the facility, state and national levels to foster data-driven quality improvement efforts.
February 23, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Kelley C McLean, Andra H James
Venous thromboembolism is a leading cause of maternal death. Because of the low absolute frequency of events, however, outcome-based clinical data are limited. Consequently, clinicians must additionally rely both on published guidelines and on extrapolation of data from studies focused on nonpregnant individuals. The diagnosis and treatment of deep vein thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and cerebral vein and dural sinus thrombosis are complicated by pregnancy, and often require modifications to standard diagnostic and treatment algorithms outside of pregnancy...
February 21, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Andra H James
Heparins, unfractionated heparin, and low molecular weight heparin, are the preferred anticoagulants in pregnancy. There are circumstances, however, in which an alternative to heparin should be considered. These circumstances include, the presence of heparin resistance, a heparin allergy manifesting as heparin-induced skin reactions or heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and the presence of a mechanical heart valve. From time to time, the obstetrician is called on to make recommendations about anticoagulants in pregnancy, including in circumstances in which an alternative to heparin has been suggested or is necessary...
February 21, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Leigh A Cantrell, Christy Garcia, Hillary S Maitland
Gynecologic surgery offers unique challenges, as pelvic surgery places patients at an increased risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE). Prevention of VTE is a goal of patients, policy makers, and surgeons. In this review, we address the current research and recommendations for VTE prophylaxis.
February 16, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Joann V Pinkerton, Andra H James
For women at elevated risk of thrombosis, clinicians are challenged to relieve menopausal symptoms without increasing the risk of thrombosis. Oral menopausal hormone therapy increases the risk of venous thromboembolism by 2-fold to 3-fold. Observational studies suggest less thrombotic risk with transdermal therapies and with progesterone over synthetic progestogens (progestins), but the data are limited. Beneficial nonpharmacologic therapies include cognitive behavioral therapy and clinical hypnosis, whereas beneficial nonhormonal pharmacologic therapies include selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors...
February 6, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Lee A Learman
Depression in pregnancy and the postpartum period is common, burdensome, and underrecognized. Guidelines from multiple organizations support routine screening once during pregnancy and again in the postpartum period. A variety of validated patient questionnaires are effective screening tools for pregnant and postpartum women. Universal screening programs can successfully overcome patient, clinician, and system barriers and reduce the burden of disease. Novel approaches include postpartum screening in pediatric settings and the use of e-screening to optimize privacy and facilitate scoring and interpretation...
January 31, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Michael W O'Hara, Jane Engeldinger
Postpartum depression is a significant public health problem affecting almost 600,000 US women every year. It may arise de novo in the postpartum period or continue from pregnancy. A number of evidence-based psychotherapies and medical treatments exist for major depression and postpartum depression. The obstetrical team has many opportunities to identify high risk and depressed women and refer them to mental health professionals or begin treatment with antidepressant medication. Careful assessment of risk factors for postpartum depression during pregnancy and monitoring depressive symptoms during pregnancy and the postpartum period will lead to better outcomes for women and their families...
January 18, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Elizabeth A Howell
Significant racial and ethnic disparities in maternal morbidity and mortality exist in the United States. Black women are 3 to 4 times more likely to die a pregnancy-related death as compared with white women. Growing research indicates that quality of health care, from preconception through postpartum care, may be a critical lever for improving outcomes for racial and ethnic minority women. This article reviews racial and ethnic disparities in severe maternal morbidities and mortality, underlying drivers of these disparities, and potential levers to reduce their occurrence...
January 16, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Marian Knight, Derek Tuffnell
The UK Confidential Enquiry into Maternal Deaths has been in operation for more than 60 years, during which time maternal mortality rates have fallen 10-fold. The program includes two aspects, surveillance and confidential case review, providing different information to aid quality improvement in maternity care. The enquiry now also reviews the care of women with specific severe morbidities. Recommendations have very clearly led to improved outcomes for women, most notably shown in the very low mortality rate due to hypertensive and related disorders of pregnancy...
January 16, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Cynthia Shellhaas, Elizabeth Conrey
Ohio established a Pregnancy-Associated Mortality Review system in 2010 to ensure that all maternal deaths are identified and preventive actions developed. The need for detailed and reliable information to supplement vital statistics data has led to the development of state-based and urban-based maternal death reviews. Although processes vary from state to state, in general, an expert panel is convened to review individual cases and make recommendations for systems change. This article describes the development and operation of Ohio's state-based maternal death review including interventions developed and actions taken based on review data...
January 12, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Sarah J Kilpatrick
Cases of severe maternal morbidity (SMM) share similarities to maternal deaths, including increasing in frequency and having similar rates of preventability. This article will review steps to organizing and implementing standard reviews of all cases of SMM. These steps include create multidisciplinary SMM review committee; identify potential SMM cases and confirm true SMM; identify the morbidity; abstract and summarize data; present case to review committee for discussion; determine events leading to morbidity; determine opportunities to improve outcome; assess provider, system and patient factors in cases with opportunities to improve outcome; make recommendations; and effect change and evaluate improvement...
January 12, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Helene B Bernstein
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 9, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Emily McQuaid, Lisa R Leffert, Brian T Bateman
Anesthesiologists are responsible for the safe and effective provision of analgesia for labor and anesthesia for cesarean delivery and other obstetric procedures. In addition, obstetric anesthesiologists often have a unique role as the intensivists of the obstetric suite. The anesthesiologist is frequently the clinician with the greatest experience in the acute bedside management of a hemodynamically unstable patient and expertise in life-saving interventions. This review will discuss (1) risks associated with neuraxial and general anesthesia for labor and delivery, and (2) clinical scenarios in which the obstetric anesthesiologist is commonly called upon to function as a "peridelivery intensivist...
January 9, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
Lisa M Keder
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 5, 2018: Clinical Obstetrics and Gynecology
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