journal
MENU ▼
Read by QxMD icon Read
search

Annals of Emergency Medicine

journal
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641909/effect-of-the-affordable-care-act-medicaid-expansion-on-emergency-department-visits-evidence-from-state-level-emergency-department-databases
#1
Sayeh Nikpay, Seth Freedman, Helen Levy, Tom Buchmueller
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We assess whether the expansion of Medicaid under the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) results in changes in emergency department (ED) visits or ED payer mix. We also test whether the size of the change in ED visits depends on the change in the size of the Medicaid population. METHODS: Using all-capture, longitudinal, state data from the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's Fast Stats program, we implemented a difference-in-difference analysis, which compared changes in ED visits per capita and the share of ED visits by payer (Medicaid, uninsured, and private insurance) in 14 states that did and 11 states that did not expand Medicaid in 2014...
June 11, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28641908/the-uncertain-economics-of-insurance-enabling-more-emergency-department-visits
#2
EDITORIAL
Ari B Friedman
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 11, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601276/managing-patients-with-nontraumatic-severe-rapid-onset-headache
#3
REVIEW
Jonathan A Edlow
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601275/practical-application-of-educational-theory-for-learning-technical-skills-in-emergency-medicine
#4
Andrew J Davis, Lizveth Fierro, Mindi Guptill, Michael Kiemeney, Lance Brown, Dustin D Smith, Timothy P Young
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601274/rocuronium-should-be-the-default-paralytic-in-rapid-sequence-intubation
#5
Anand K Swaminathan, Haney Mallemat
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601273/potential-impact-of-the-2016-consensus-definitions-of-sepsis-and-septic-shock-on-future-sepsis-research
#6
Sandra L Peake, Anthony Delaney, Michael Bailey, Rinaldo Bellomo
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The influence of the Third International Consensus Definitions for Sepsis and Septic Shock (Sepsis-3) on the conduct of future sepsis research is unknown. We seek to examine the potential effect of the new definitions on the identification and outcomes of patients enrolled in a sepsis trial. METHODS: This was a post hoc analysis of the Australasian Resuscitation in Sepsis Evaluation (ARISE) trial of early goal-directed therapy that recruited 1,591 adult patients presenting to the emergency department (ED) with early septic shock diagnosed by greater than or equal to 2 systemic inflammatory response syndrome criteria and either refractory hypotension or hyperlactatemia...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601272/safety-considerations-and-guideline-based-safe-use-recommendations-for-bolus-dose-vasopressors-in-the-emergency-department
#7
Devin Holden, Jessica Ramich, Edward Timm, Denis Pauze, Timothy Lesar
The use of intermittently administered doses of vasopressors to correct hypotension in the emergency department (ED), commonly referred to as bolus-dose pressors, push-dose pressors, Neo-sticks, or phenyl sticks, has been widely advocated outside of the traditional printed medical literature. No outcomes data of this practice exist to demonstrate benefits over traditional continuous infusion of vasopressors. Use of bolus-dose vasopressors in the ED setting raises a number of patient safety concerns, and misuse and errors in the preparation and administration of bolus-dose vasopressors may result in patient harm...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601271/does-spontaneous-cardiac-motion-identified-with-point-of-care-echocardiography-during-cardiac-arrest-predict-survival
#8
EDITORIAL
Michael D April, Brit Long
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601270/comparative-effectiveness-of-patient-controlled-analgesia-for-treating-acute-pain-in-the-emergency%C3%A2-department
#9
Polly E Bijur, Angela M Mills, Andrew K Chang, Deborah White, Andrew Restivo, Shaun Persaud, Clyde B Schechter, E John Gallagher, Adrienne J Birnbaum
STUDY OBJECTIVE: We assess the effectiveness of patient-controlled analgesia in the emergency department (ED). We hypothesized that decline in pain intensity from 30 to 120 minutes after initial intravenous opioid administration is greater in patients receiving morphine by patient-controlled analgesia compared with usual care and would differ by a clinically significant amount. METHOD: This was a pragmatic randomized controlled trial of patient-controlled analgesia and usual care (opioid and dose at physician's discretion) in 4 EDs...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601269/the-bougie-and-first-pass-success-in-the-emergency%C3%A2-department
#10
Brian Driver, Kenneth Dodd, Lauren R Klein, Ryan Buckley, Aaron Robinson, John W McGill, Robert F Reardon, Matthew E Prekker
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The bougie may improve first-pass intubation success in operating room patients. We seek to determine whether bougie use is associated with emergency department (ED) first-pass intubation success. METHODS: We studied consecutive adult ED intubations at an urban, academic medical center during 2013. Intubation events were identified by motion-activated video recording. We determined the association between bougie use and first-pass intubation success, adjusting for neuromuscular blockade, video laryngoscopy, abnormal airway anatomy, and whether the patient was placed in the sniffing position or the head was lifted off the bed during intubation...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601268/the-efficacy-of-crotalidae-polyvalent-immune-fab-ovine-antivenom-versus-placebo-plus-optional-rescue%C3%A2-therapy-on-recovery-from-copperhead-snake-envenomation-a-randomized-double-blind-placebo-controlled-clinical-trial
#11
Charles J Gerardo, Eugenia Quackenbush, Brandon Lewis, S Rutherfoord Rose, Spencer Greene, Eric A Toschlog, Nathan P Charlton, Michael E Mullins, Richard Schwartz, David Denning, Kapil Sharma, Kurt Kleinschmid, Sean P Bush, Samantha Ryan, Maria Gasior, Victoria E Anderson, Eric J Lavonas
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Copperhead snake (Agkistrodon contortrix) envenomation causes limb injury resulting in pain and disability. It is not known whether antivenom administration improves limb function. We determine whether administration of antivenom improves recovery from limb injury in patients envenomated by copperhead snakes. METHODS: From August 2013 through November 2015, we performed a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, clinical trial to evaluate the effect of ovine Crotalidae polyvalent immune Fab (ovine) (CroFab; FabAV) antivenom therapy on recovery of limb function in patients with copperhead snake envenomation at 14 days postenvenomation...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601267/hypotension-in-traumatic-brain-injury-describing-the-depth-of-the-problem
#12
EDITORIAL
Christian Martin-Gill, Francis X Guyette
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601266/emergency-physician-use-of-cognitive-strategies-to-manage-interruptions
#13
Raj M Ratwani, Allan Fong, Josh S Puthumana, Aaron Z Hettinger
STUDY OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study is to examine whether emergency physicians use strategies to manage interruptions during clinical work. Interruption management strategies include immediately engaging the interruption by discontinuing the current task and starting the interruption, continuing the current task while engaging the interruption, rejecting the interruption, or delaying the interruption. METHODS: An observational time and motion study was conducted in 3 different urban, academic emergency departments with 18 attending emergency physicians...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601265/what-baseline-clinical-features-are-associated-with-survival-or-good-neurologic-outcome-after-extracorporeal-cardiopulmonary-resuscitation
#14
EDITORIAL
Joshua C Reynolds, Ben Singer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28601264/high-flow-nasal-cannula-versus-conventional-oxygen-therapy-in-emergency-department-patients-with-cardiogenic-pulmonary-edema-a%C3%A2-randomized-controlled-trial
#15
Onlak Makdee, Apichaya Monsomboon, Usapan Surabenjawong, Nattakarn Praphruetkit, Wansiri Chaisirin, Tipa Chakorn, Chairat Permpikul, Phakphoom Thiravit, Tanyaporn Nakornchai
STUDY OBJECTIVE: High-flow nasal cannula is a new method for delivering high-flow supplemental oxygen for victims of respiratory failure. This randomized controlled trial compares high-flow nasal cannula with conventional oxygen therapy in emergency department (ED) patients with cardiogenic pulmonary edema. METHODS: We conducted an open-label randomized controlled trial in the ED of Siriraj Hospital, Bangkok, Thailand. Patients aged 18 years or older with cardiogenic pulmonary edema were randomly assigned to receive either conventional oxygen therapy or high-flow nasal cannula...
June 7, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28583403/improving-recognition-of-pediatric-severe-sepsis-in%C3%A2-the-emergency-department-contributions-of%C3%A2-a%C3%A2-vital-sign-based-electronic-alert-and-bedside-clinician-identification
#16
Fran Balamuth, Elizabeth R Alpern, Mary Kate Abaddessa, Katie Hayes, Aileen Schast, Jane Lavelle, Julie C Fitzgerald, Scott L Weiss, Joseph J Zorc
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Recognition of pediatric sepsis is a key clinical challenge. We evaluate the performance of a sepsis recognition process including an electronic sepsis alert and bedside assessment in a pediatric emergency department (ED). METHODS: This was a cohort study with quality improvement intervention in a pediatric ED. Exposure was a positive electronic sepsis alert, defined as elevated pulse rate or hypotension, concern for infection, and at least one of the following: abnormal capillary refill, abnormal mental status, or high-risk condition...
May 27, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28583402/between-the-devil-and-the-deep-blue-sea-use-of-real-time-tools-to-identify-children-with-severe-sepsis-in-the-pediatric-emergency-department
#17
EDITORIAL
Andrea T Cruz
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 27, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28559040/are-%C3%AE-blockers-beneficial-for-outpatient-management-of-uncomplicated-ureteric-stones
#18
EDITORIAL
Nicholas Harrison, Charlene Babcock
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 27, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28559039/geographic-variation-in-use-of-ambulance-transport-to-the-emergency-department
#19
Amresh D Hanchate, Michael K Paasche-Orlow, K Sophia Dyer, William E Baker, Chen Feng, James Feldman
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Evidence on variability in emergency medical services use is limited. We obtain national evidence on geographic variation in the use of ambulance transport to the emergency department (ED) among Medicare enrollees and assess the role of health status, socioeconomic status, and provider availability. METHODS: We used 2010 Medicare claims data for a random sample of 999,999 enrollees aged 66 years and older, and identified ambulance transport and ED use...
May 27, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/28559038/nonphysician-out-of-hospital-rapid-sequence-intubation-success-and-adverse-events-a%C3%A2-systematic-review-and-meta-analysis
#20
REVIEW
Pieter F Fouche, Christopher Stein, Paul Simpson, Jestin N Carlson, Suhail A Doi
STUDY OBJECTIVE: Rapid sequence intubation performed by nonphysicians such as paramedics or nurses has become increasingly common in many countries; however, concerns have been stated in regard to the safe use and appropriateness of rapid sequence intubation when performed by these health care providers. The aim of our study is to compare rapid sequence intubation success and adverse events between nonphysician and physician in the out-of-hospital setting. METHODS: A systematic literature search of key databases including MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was conducted...
May 27, 2017: Annals of Emergency Medicine
journal
journal
20030
1
2
Fetch more papers »
Fetching more papers... Fetching...
Read by QxMD. Sign in or create an account to discover new knowledge that matter to you.
Remove bar
Read by QxMD icon Read
×

Search Tips

Use Boolean operators: AND/OR

diabetic AND foot
diabetes OR diabetic

Exclude a word using the 'minus' sign

Virchow -triad

Use Parentheses

water AND (cup OR glass)

Add an asterisk (*) at end of a word to include word stems

Neuro* will search for Neurology, Neuroscientist, Neurological, and so on

Use quotes to search for an exact phrase

"primary prevention of cancer"
(heart or cardiac or cardio*) AND arrest -"American Heart Association"