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Anesthesiology

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https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771708/saber-sheath-tracheal-deformity
#1
Ali Kandil, Arpa Chutipongtanate, Robert E Wood, Mohamed Mahmoud
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 17, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771711/respiratory-muscle-effort-during-expiration-in-successful-and-failed-weaning-from-mechanical-ventilation
#2
Jonne Doorduin, Lisanne H Roesthuis, Diana Jansen, Johannes G van der Hoeven, Hieronymus W H van Hees, Leo M A Heunks
BACKGROUND: Respiratory muscle weakness in critically ill patients is associated with difficulty in weaning from mechanical ventilation. Previous studies have mainly focused on inspiratory muscle activity during weaning; expiratory muscle activity is less well understood. The current study describes expiratory muscle activity during weaning, including tonic diaphragm activity. The authors hypothesized that expiratory muscle effort is greater in patients who fail to wean compared to those who wean successfully...
May 16, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771710/cognitive-decline-after-delirium-in-patients-undergoing-cardiac-surgery
#3
Charles H Brown, Julia Probert, Ryan Healy, Michelle Parish, Yohei Nomura, Atsushi Yamaguchi, Jing Tian, Kenton Zehr, Kaushik Mandal, Vidyulata Kamath, Karin J Neufeld, Charles W Hogue
BACKGROUND: Delirium is common after cardiac surgery and has been associated with morbidity, mortality, and cognitive decline. However, there are conflicting reports on the magnitude, trajectory, and domains of cognitive change that might be affected. The authors hypothesized that patients with delirium would experience greater cognitive decline at 1 month and 1 yr after cardiac surgery compared to those without delirium. METHODS: Patients who underwent coronary artery bypass and/or valve surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass were eligible for this cohort study...
May 16, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29771709/combined-recirculatory-compartmental-population-pharmacokinetic-modeling-of-arterial-and-venous-plasma-s-and-r-ketamine-concentrations
#4
Thomas K Henthorn, Michael J Avram, Albert Dahan, Lars L Gustafsson, Jan Persson, Tom C Krejcie, Erik Olofsen
BACKGROUND: The pharmacokinetics of infused drugs have been modeled without regard for recirculatory or mixing kinetics. We used a unique ketamine dataset with simultaneous arterial and venous blood sampling, during and after separate S(+) and R(-) ketamine infusions, to develop a simplified recirculatory model of arterial and venous plasma drug concentrations. METHODS: S(+) or R(-) ketamine was infused over 30 min on two occasions to 10 healthy male volunteers...
May 16, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762183/butterfly-vertebrae
#5
Curtis C Copeland, Bianca M Conti, L Yvette Fouché-Weber, Thomas Grissom
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 15, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762182/liquid-lightness
#6
Kate Walker
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 15, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762181/intraneural-ultrasound-guided-sciatic-nerve-block-minimum-effective-volume-and-electrophysiologic-effects
#7
Gianluca Cappelleri, Andrea Luigi Ambrosoli, Marco Gemma, Valeria Libera Eva Cedrati, Federico Bizzarri, Giorgio Francesco Danelli
BACKGROUND: Both extra- and intraneural sciatic injection resulted in significant axonal nerve damage. This study aimed to establish the minimum effective volume of intraneural ropivacaine 1% for complete sensory-motor sciatic nerve block in 90% of patients, and related electrophysiologic variations. METHODS: Forty-seven consecutive American Society of Anesthesiologists physical status I-II patients received an ultrasound-guided popliteal intraneural nerve block following the up-and-down biased coin design...
May 15, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762180/presumed-%C3%AE-lactam-allergy-and-cross-reactivity-in-the-operating-theater-a-practical-approach
#8
Jeroen Hermanides, Bregtje A Lemkes, Jan M Prins, Markus W Hollmann, Ingrid Terreehorst
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 15, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29762179/reinke-s-edema-implications-for-airway-management
#9
Roshni Sreedharan, Surendrasingh Chhabada, Sandeep Khanna
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 15, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29757769/delayed-tension-pneumomediastinum-after-cardiac-surgery
#10
Michael W Wolfe, Joseph S Meltzer
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 14, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29757768/labrys
#11
Nancy Nowak
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 14, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29750663/free-fatty-acid-receptor-g-protein-coupled-receptor-40-mediates-lipid-emulsion-induced-cardioprotection-erratum
#12
(no author information available yet)
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 10, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29750662/supplemental-carbon-dioxide-stabilizes-the-upper-airway-in-volunteers-anesthetized-with-propofol
#13
Katarina Jennifer Ruscic, Janne Bøgh Stokholm, Johann Patlak, Hao Deng, Jeroen Cedric Peter Simons, Timothy Houle, Jürgen Peters, Matthias Eikermann
BACKGROUND: Propofol impairs upper airway dilator muscle tone and increases upper airway collapsibility. Preclinical studies show that carbon dioxide decreases propofol-mediated respiratory depression. We studied whether elevation of end-tidal carbon dioxide (PETCO2) via carbon dioxide insufflation reverses the airway collapsibility (primary hypothesis) and impaired genioglossus muscle electromyogram that accompany propofol anesthesia. METHODS: We present a prespecified, secondary analysis of previously published experiments in 12 volunteers breathing via a high-flow respiratory circuit used to control upper airway pressure under propofol anesthesia at two levels, with the deep level titrated to suppression of motor response...
May 10, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29620570/free-fatty-acid-receptor-g-protein-coupled-receptor-40-mediates-lipid-emulsion-induced-cardioprotection
#14
Soban Umar, Jingyuan Li, Kyle Hannabass, Mylene Vaillancourt, Christine M Cunningham, Shayan Moazeni, Aman Mahajan, Mansoureh Eghbali
BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that intralipid (lipid emulsion) protects the heart against ischemia/reperfusion injury and bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity. However, the precise underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we explored the hypothesis that free fatty acid receptor-1 or G-protein-coupled receptor 40 is expressed in the heart and that cardioprotective effects of lipid emulsion are mediated through G-protein-coupled receptor 40 in two animal models of ischemia/reperfusion injury and bupivacaine-induced cardiotoxicity...
May 10, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738328/persistent-postsurgical-pain-pathophysiology-and-preventative-pharmacologic-considerations
#15
Philippe Richebé, Xavier Capdevila, Cyril Rivat
The development of chronic pain is considered a major complication after surgery. Basic science research in animal models helps us understand the transition from acute to chronic pain by identifying the numerous molecular and cellular changes that occur in the peripheral and central nervous systems. It is now well recognized that inflammation and nerve injury lead to long-term synaptic plasticity that amplifies and also maintains pain signaling, a phenomenon referred to as pain sensitization. In the context of surgery in humans, pain sensitization is both responsible for an increase in postoperative pain via the expression of wound hyperalgesia and considered a critical factor for the development of persistent postsurgical pain...
May 7, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29738327/persistent-pulmonary-interstitial-emphysema
#16
Sheri Jones, Shanique Kilgallon, Alan Jay Schwartz, Rajeev Subramanyam
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
May 7, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29734230/ketamine-alters-hippocampal-cell-proliferation-and-improves-learning-in-mice-after-traumatic-brain-injury
#17
Austin J Peters, Laura E Villasana, Eric Schnell
BACKGROUND: Traumatic brain injury induces cellular proliferation in the hippocampus, which generates new neurons and glial cells during recovery. This process is regulated by N-methyl-D-aspartate-type glutamate receptors, which are inhibited by ketamine. The authors hypothesized that ketamine treatment after traumatic brain injury would reduce hippocampal cell proliferation, leading to worse behavioral outcomes in mice. METHODS: Traumatic brain injury was induced in mice using a controlled cortical impact injury, after which mice (N = 118) received either ketamine or vehicle systemically for 1 week...
April 30, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29708892/continuous-negative-abdominal-pressure-reduces-ventilator-induced-lung-injury-in-a-porcine-model
#18
Takeshi Yoshida, Doreen Engelberts, Gail Otulakowski, Bhushan Katira, Martin Post, Niall D Ferguson, Laurent Brochard, Marcelo B P Amato, Brian P Kavanagh
BACKGROUND: In supine patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, the lung typically partitions into regions of dorsal atelectasis and ventral aeration ("baby lung"). Positive airway pressure is often used to recruit atelectasis, but often overinflates ventral (already aerated) regions. A novel approach to selective recruitment of dorsal atelectasis is by "continuous negative abdominal pressure." METHODS: A randomized laboratory study was performed in anesthetized pigs...
April 27, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29698253/auditory-icon-alarms-are-more-accurately-and-quickly-identified-than-current-standard-melodic-alarms-in-a-simulated-clinical-setting
#19
Richard R McNeer, Danielle Bodzin Horn, Christopher L Bennett, Judy Reed Edworthy, Roman Dudaryk
BACKGROUND: Current standard audible medical alarms are difficult to learn and distinguish from one another. Auditory icons represent a new type of alarm that has been shown to be easier to learn and identify in laboratory settings by lay subjects. In this study, we test the hypothesis that icon alarms are easier to learn and identify than standard alarms by anesthesia providers in a simulated clinical setting. METHODS: Twenty anesthesia providers were assigned to standard or icon groups...
April 26, 2018: Anesthesiology
https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/29688900/noninvasive-tracking-of-anesthesia-neurotoxicity-in-the-developing-rodent-brain
#20
Rany Makaryus, Hedok Lee, John Robinson, Grigori Enikolopov, Helene Benveniste
BACKGROUND: Potential deleterious effect of multiple anesthesia exposures on the developing brain remains a clinical concern. We hypothesized that multiple neonatal anesthesia exposures are more detrimental to brain maturation than an equivalent single exposure, with more pronounced long-term behavioral consequences. We designed a translational approach using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in rodents, noninvasively tracking the neuronal marker N-acetyl-aspartate, in addition to tracking behavioral outcomes...
April 24, 2018: Anesthesiology
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