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American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care

Celeste H Claudio, Zoelle B Dizon, Tessie W October
BACKGROUND: Accessible information about palliative care available to the public on the Internet is growing. We do not know whether this information is consistent with the current accepted definition of palliative care. AIM: To identify resources on the Internet and social media regarding palliative care and evaluate the information conveyed. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study of "palliative care" search results. SETTING: Top 10 Google websites, top 10 most viewed YouTube videos, and social media platforms, Facebook and Twitter, were searched...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Nikhil Satchidanand, Timothy J Servoss, Ranjit Singh, Angela M Bosinski, Penny Tirpak, Linda L Horton, Bruce J Naughton
BACKGROUND: Early, data-driven discussion surrounding palliative care can improve care delivery and patient experience. OBJECTIVE: To develop a 30-day mortality prediction tool for older patients in intensive care unit (ICU) with pneumonia that will initiate palliative care earlier in hospital course. DESIGN: Retrospective Electronic Health Record (EHR) review. SETTING: Four urban and suburban hospitals in a Western New York hospital system...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Karen O Moss, Nancy L Deutsch, Patricia J Hollen, Virginia G Rovnyak, Ishan C Williams, Karen M Rose
African Americans are perceived to be least likely of all racial and ethnic groups to prepare for the end of life. However, verbal plans for the end of life are of particular importance to this population and may help understand why they are less likely to possess a formal end-of-life care planning document. The purpose of this study was to determine the number of formal and/or informal end-of-life care plans that existed among a convenience sample of African American older adults with dementia. For this descriptive study, data were collected from African American family caregivers (N = 65) of older adults with dementia...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Zhe Zhang, Meng-Lei Chen, Xiao-Li Gu, Ming-Hui Liu, Wei-Wei Zhao, Wen-Wu Cheng
BACKGROUND: Although palliative chemotherapy during end-of-life (EOL) care is used to relieve symptoms in patients with metastatic cancer, chemotherapy may lead to more aggressive EOL care. We evaluated the use of and variables associated with chemotherapy at EOL. METHODS: This study included data from patients who died from advanced cancer and underwent palliative chemotherapy between April 2007 and May 2017 at the Department of Palliative Care of Fudan University, Shanghai Cancer Center...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Jeff Myers, Roxanne Cosby, Danusia Gzik, Ingrid Harle, Deb Harrold, Nadia Incardona, Tara Walton
BACKGROUND: Advance care planning and goals of care discussions involve the exploration of what is most important to a person, including their values and beliefs in preparation for health-care decision-making. Advance care planning conversations focus on planning for future health care, ensuring that an incapable person's wishes are known and can guide the person's substitute decision maker for future decision-making. Goals of care discussions focus on preparing for current decision-making by ensuring the person's goals guide this process...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Myrick C Shinall, E Wesley Ely, Mohana Karlekar, Samuel G Robbins, Rameela Chandrasekhar, Sara F Martin
BACKGROUND: The Functional Assessment of Chronic Illness Therapy-Palliative (FACIT-Pal) 14 instrument measures the quality of life in palliative care patients but its psychometric properties are not well characterized. OBJECTIVES: To establish the reliability and validity of the FACIT-Pal 14 in an outpatient palliative care clinic population. METHODS: The FACIT-Pal 14 was administered to 227 patients in an outpatient palliative care clinic at a large, urban academic medical center...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Han-Lin Chi, Janine Cataldo, Evelyn Y Ho, Roberta S Rehm
BACKGROUND: Health-care providers (HCPs) find facilitating end-of-life (EOL) care discussions challenging, especially with patients whose ethnicities differ from their own. Currently, there is little guidance on how to initiate and facilitate such discussions with older Chinese Americans (≥55 years) and their families. OBJECTIVE: To explore communication strategies for HCPs to initiate EOL care discussions with older Chinese Americans in the San Francisco Bay Area...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Elizabeth Holman, Cari Levy, Brenda Kennedy
Animal-assisted intervention is gaining attention as a stress reduction modality. Quantitative data demonstrate its effectiveness, as a recent study published in AJHPM supported that a Veterans Affairs (VA) hospital facility dog paired with a palliative care psychologist had a measurable impact on salivary cortisol levels and heart rate in hospitalized veterans. There remains an important role for qualitative insights. The Denver VA palliative care team learned a range of lessons from the sudden loss of their facility dog, many of which relate directly to palliative care...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Phillip M Pifer, Mark K Farrugia, Malcolm D Mattes
BACKGROUND: Early palliative/supportive care (PSC) consultation and advance care planning (ACP) improve outcomes for patients with incurable cancer. However, PSC is underutilized in the United States. OBJECTIVE: To examine philosophical differences among PSC, radiation oncology (RO), and medical oncology (MO) physicians in order to understand barriers to early PSC referral. DESIGN: An electronic survey collected views of a nationwide cohort of health-care professionals regarding ACP and end-of-life care...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Salimah H Meghani, Caroline Peterson, Donna H Kaiser, Joseph Rhodes, Hengyi Rao, Jesse Chittams, Anjan Chatterjee
BACKGROUND: Patients with cancer frequently experience physical and psychological distress that can worsen their quality of life. OBJECTIVES: We assessed the outcomes of an 8-week mindfulness-based art therapy (MBAT) intervention, Walkabout: Looking In, Looking Out, on symptoms, sleep quality, health-related quality of life, sense of coherence (SOC), and spirituality in outpatients with cancer. METHODS: A 1-group, pre-post intervention design with repeated measures at baseline, week 4, and week 8...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Steven J Baumrucker, Matt Stolick, Laura Hutchinson, Gregg VandeKieft, Angela Cullop, Ella Farida Meade, Russell W Adkins
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Stephanie Stiel, Maria Heckel, Kim Nikola Wendt, Martin Weber, Christoph Ostgathe
BACKGROUND: Patient-reported outcomes are usually considered to be the gold standard assessment. However, for the assessment of quality of dying and death, ratings of informal caregivers (ICGs) or health-care professionals (HCPs) must be considered for ethical and methodological reasons. This article aims to present results of ICGs' and HCPs' estimates of the questionnaire, quality of dying and death (QoDD) on patients who died in PCUs and to compare the level of agreement of both ratings/raters...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Madison B Smith, Tamara G R Macieira, Michael D Bumbach, Susan J Garbutt, Sandra W Citty, Anita Stephen, Margaret Ansell, Toni L Glover, Gail Keenan
OBJECTIVES: To present the findings of a systematic review on the use of simulation-based learning experiences (SBLEs) to teach communication skills to nursing students and clinicians who provide palliative and end-of-life care to patients and their families. BACKGROUND: Palliative care communication skills are fundamental to providing holistic patient care. Since nurses have the greatest amount of direct exposure to patients, building such communication competencies is essential...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Jason T Hotchkiss
BACKGROUND: Effective self-care in hospice is anecdotally proclaimed to reduce burnout risk. Yet, the topic has received little empirical attention. PURPOSE: This study developed a model for predicting burnout risk from compassion satisfaction (CS), secondary traumatic stress (STS), and mindful self-care. PARTICIPANTS: Hospice care professionals (n = 324). DESIGN: Cross-sectional self-report survey. RESULTS: Mindful self-care was correlated with CS ( r = 0...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Marin Golčić, Renata Dobrila-Dintinjana, Goran Golčić, Ira Pavlović-Ružić, Aleksandra Stevanović, Lidija Gović-Golčić
PURPOSE: Quality of life is the cornerstone of palliative care, and assessing it requires validated and standardized questionnaires. However, the majority of questionnaires are not tested in a hospice setting. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the quality of life in a hospice using the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 15 for Palliative Care (PAL) (EORTC QLQ-C15-PAL) questionnaire and validating it in Croatian language...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Debra M Glick, Joan M Cook, Jennifer Moye, Anica Pless Kaiser
Post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) may first emerge, reemerge, or worsen as individuals approach end of life and may complicate the dying process. Unfortunately, lack of awareness of the occurrence and/or manifestation of PTSD at end of life can lead to PTSD going unaddressed. Even if PTSD is properly diagnosed, traditional evidence-based trauma-focused treatments may not be feasible or advisable with this group as many patients at end of life often lack the physical and mental stamina to participate in traditional psychotherapy...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Olga Ehrlich, Rachel K Walker
BACKGROUND: Qualitative pain research for hospice patients with cancer and their caregivers involves recruiting and retaining participants with multiple vulnerabilities and ethical and logistical challenges. These have been reported for studies of individuals or dyads. However, there are no reports of the related challenges and outcomes where the sampled population was a hospice triad. OBJECTIVES: Qualitative research about pain management for home hospice patients with cancer contributes rich descriptive data and such studies are critical to improving cancer pain outcomes...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Megan Lippe, Bailey Johnson, Stephanie Barger Mohr, Kyle Rhoads Kraemer
To provide adequate care, students from all health-care professions require education regarding palliative and end-of-life (EOL) care prior to entering professional practice. In particular, students need proper training to be equal members of interprofessional teams providing palliative and EOL care. However, limited information is currently available about the effectiveness of educational interventions relating to palliative and EOL care. Thus, an assessment of educational interventions to utilize in providing this education is warranted...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Grace Meijuan Yang, Irene Teo, Shirlyn Hui-Shan Neo, Daniel Tan, Yin Bun Cheung
CONTEXT: New models of care that are effective and feasible for widespread implementation need to be developed for the delivery of early palliative care to patients with advanced cancer. OBJECTIVES: The objectives were to determine the feasibility and acceptability of the Enhancing Quality of Life in Patients (EQUIP) intervention, data completion rate of patient-reported outcome measures in the context of the EQUIP trial, and the estimated effect of the EQUIP intervention on quality of life and mood...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
Jeffrey Wang, Shahida Khan, Paige Wyer, Jessica Vanderwilp, Justin Reynolds, Bruce Bethancourt, Ken S Ota
BACKGROUND: Patients with ascites suffer from distressing symptoms and are at high risk for readmission after hospitalization. Timely paracentesis is an important palliative tool in managing this vulnerable population. At our institution, we have developed a multidisciplinary transitional care program for patients discharged from the hospital with a wide range of complex conditions including refractory ascites. METHODS: We present a case series of 10 patients with symptomatic ascites who were enrolled in our transitional care program and treated with ultrasound-guided therapeutic paracentesis in our clinic...
January 1, 2018: American Journal of Hospice & Palliative Care
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