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American Journal of Epidemiology

Ester Rita Alessandrini, Massimo Stafoggia, Annunziata Faustini, Giovanna Berti, Cristina Canova, Aldo De Togni, Katiuscia Di Biagio, Bianca Gherardi, Simone Giannini, Paolo Lauriola, Paolo Pandolfi, Giorgia Randi, Andrea Ranzi, Lorenzo Simonato, Stefano Zauli Sajani, Ennio Cadum, Francesco Forastiere
We performed a multisite study to evaluate demographic and clinical conditions as potential modifiers of the particulate matter (PM)-mortality association. We selected 228,619 natural deaths of elderly persons (ages ≥65 years) that occurred in 12 Italian cities during the period 2006-2010. Individual data on causes of death, age, sex, location of death, and preexisting chronic and acute conditions from the previous 5 years' hospitalizations were collected. City-specific conditional logistic regression models were applied within the case-crossover "time-stratified" framework, followed by random-effects meta-analysis...
October 25, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Jesper Hallas, Anton Pottegård, Shirley Wang, Sebastian Schneeweiss, Joshua J Gagne
Studying the effect of chronic medication exposure by means of a case-crossover design may result in an upward-biased odds ratio. In this study, our aim was to assess the occurrence of this bias and to evaluate whether it is remedied by including a control group (the case-time-control design). Using Danish data resources from 1995-2012, we conducted case-crossover and case-time-control analyses for 3 medications (statins, insulin, and thyroxine) in relation to 3 outcomes (retinal detachment, wrist fracture, and ischemic stroke), all with assumed null associations...
October 25, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Kévin Jean, Marie-Claude Boily, Christine Danel, Raoul Moh, Anani Badjé, Annabel Desgrées-du-Loû, Serge Eholié, France Lert, Rosemary Dray-Spira, Xavier Anglaret, Eric Ouattara
Whether risk compensation could offset the preventive effect of early initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) on human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission remains unknown. Using virological and behavioral data collected 12 months after inclusion in the TEMPRANO randomized trial of early ART (Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 2009-2012), we estimated the risk of HIV transmission and compared it between the intervention (early ART; n = 490) and control (deferred ART; n = 467) groups. We then simulated increases in various sexual risk behaviors in the intervention group and estimated the resulting preventive effect...
October 24, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Tuomas P Kilpeläinen, Kirsi Talala, Jani Raitanen, Kimmo Taari, Paula Kujala, Teuvo L J Tammela, Anssi Auvinen
Prostate cancer (PC) screening remains controversial. We investigated whether screening reduces the difference in prostate cancer risk by socioeconomic status (SES). In 1996-2011, a total of 72,139 men from the Finnish Randomized Study of Screening for Prostate Cancer were analyzed. Outcome measures were PC incidence, mortality, and participation in screening. SES indicators were educational level, income, and home ownership status (data obtained from the Statistics Finland registry). The mean duration of follow-up was 12...
October 24, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Lauren E Griffith, Edwin van den Heuvel, Parminder Raina, Isabel Fortier, Nazmul Sohel, Scott M Hofer, Hélène Payette, Christina Wolfson, Sylvie Belleville, Meghan Kenny, Dany Doiron
Standardization procedures are commonly used to combine phenotype data that were measured using different instruments, but there is little information on how the choice of standardization method influences pooled estimates and heterogeneity. Heterogeneity is of key importance in meta-analyses of observational studies because it affects the statistical models used and the decision of whether or not it is appropriate to calculate a pooled estimate of effect. Using 2-stage individual participant data analyses, we compared 2 common methods of standardization, T-scores and category-centered scores, to create combinable memory scores using cross-sectional data from 3 Canadian population-based studies (the Canadian Study on Health and Aging (1991-1992), the Canadian Community Health Survey on Healthy Aging (2008-2009), and the Quebec Longitudinal Study on Nutrition and Aging (2004-2005))...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Katherine A Guthrie, Hilary S Gammill, Mads Kamper-Jørgensen, Anne Tjønneland, Vijayakrishna K Gadi, J Lee Nelson, Wendy Leisenring
Natural acquisition of small amounts of foreign cells or DNA, referred to as microchimerism, occurs primarily through maternal-fetal exchange during pregnancy. Microchimerism can persist long-term and has been associated with both beneficial and adverse human health outcomes. Quantitative microchimerism data present challenges for statistical analysis, including a skewed distribution, excess zero values, and occasional large values. Methods for comparing microchimerism levels across groups while controlling for covariates are not well established...
October 21, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Michael Y Ni, Tom K Li, Herbert Pang, Brandford H Y Chan, Betty Y Yuan, Ichiro Kawachi, C Mary Schooling, Gabriel M Leung
Despite the extensive history of social movements around the world, the evolution of population mental health before, during, and after a social movement remains sparsely documented. We sought to assess over time the prevalence of depressive symptoms during and after the Occupy Central movement in Hong Kong and to examine the associations of direct and indirect exposures to Occupy Central with depressive symptoms. We longitudinally administered interviews to 909 adults who were randomly sampled from the population-representative FAMILY Cohort at 6 time points from March 2009 to March 2015: twice each before, during, and after the Occupy Central protests...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Timothy S Church
The analysis plan and article in this issue of the Journal by Evenson et al. (Am J Epidemiol 2016;000(000):0000-0000) is well-conceived, thoughtfully conducted, and tightly written. The authors utilized the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey data set to examine the association between accelerometer-measured physical activity level and mortality and found that meeting the 2013 federal Physical Activity Guidelines resulted in a 35% reduction in risk of mortality. The timing of these findings could not be better, given the ubiquitous nature of personal accelerometer devices...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Kelly R Evenson, Fang Wen, Amy H Herring
The US physical activity (PA) recommendations were based primarily on studies in which self-reported data were used. Studies that include accelerometer-assessed PA and sedentary behavior can contribute to these recommendations. In the present study, we explored the associations of PA and sedentary behavior with all-cause and cardiovascular disease (CVD) mortality in a nationally representative sample. Among the 2003-2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey cohort, 3,809 adults 40 years of age or older wore an accelerometer for 1 week and self-reported their PA levels...
October 19, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Gizem Dilan Yesil, Olta Gishti, Janine F Felix, Irwin Reiss, Mohammad Kamran Ikram, Eric A P Steegers, Albert Hofman, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Romy Gaillard
Gestational hypertensive disorders may lead to vascular changes in the offspring. We examined the associations of maternal blood pressure development and hypertensive disorders during pregnancy with microvasculature adaptations in the offspring in childhood. This study was performed as part of the Generation R Study in Rotterdam, the Netherlands (2002-2012), among 3,748 pregnant mothers and their children for whom information was available on maternal blood pressure in different periods of pregnancy and gestational hypertensive disorders...
October 17, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Priscila F Tempaku, Daniela L de Oliveira, Camila Hirotsu, Monica L Andersen, Sergio Tufik
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Olta Gishti, Janine F Felix, Irwin Reiss, Mohammad Kamran Ikram, Eric A P Steegers, Albert Hofman, Vincent W V Jaddoe, Romy Gaillard
No abstract text is available yet for this article.
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Odaro Huckstep, Adam J Lewandowski, Paul Leeson
Human clinical studies as well as laboratory animal studies demonstrate that offspring of pregnancies affected by common complications, such as preeclampsia and preterm birth, display developmental phenotypes that relate distinctly to the pregnancy disorder. Several studies have now found microvascular differences in offspring of hypertensive pregnancies, and there is interest in whether these may underlie epidemiologic associations between gestational hypertension and a higher risk of hypertension and stroke in the offspring...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Annah B Wyss, Mia Hashibe, Yuan-Chin Amy Lee, Shu-Chun Chuang, Joshua Muscat, Chu Chen, Stephen M Schwartz, Elaine Smith, Zuo-Feng Zhang, Hal Morgenstern, Qingyi Wei, Guojun Li, Karl T Kelsey, Michael McClean, Deborah M Winn, Stimson Schantz, Guo-Pei Yu, Maura L Gillison, Jose P Zevallos, Paolo Boffetta, Andrew F Olshan
Previous studies on smokeless tobacco use and head and neck cancer (HNC) have found inconsistent and often imprecise estimates, with limited control for cigarette smoking. Using pooled data from 11 US case-control studies (1981-2006) of oral, pharyngeal, and laryngeal cancers (6,772 cases and 8,375 controls) in the International Head and Neck Cancer Epidemiology (INHANCE) Consortium, we applied hierarchical logistic regression to estimate odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals for ever use, frequency of use, and duration of use of snuff and chewing tobacco separately for never and ever cigarette smokers...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Stefan Flasche, Noga Givon-Lavi, Ron Dagan
Pneumococcal conjugate vaccines (PCVs) have substantially reduced the burden of pneumococcal disease, including the incidence of otitis media (OM). However, in most countries, no surveillance exists to monitor the change in pneumococcal OM incidence after the introduction of PCVs. We explored whether measuring pneumococcal carriage was a useful surrogate for monitoring postvaccination changes in the incidence of pneumococcal OM. The 7-valent PCV was introduced to Israel's national immunization program in July 2009 and gradually replaced by the 13-valent PCV starting in November 2010...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Valentina A Andreeva, Valérie Deschamps, Benoît Salanave, Katia Castetbon, Charlotte Verdot, Emmanuelle Kesse-Guyot, Serge Hercberg
Despite some advantages over traditional methods, Web-based studies elicit concerns about generalizability. To address this issue, we compared dietary intakes between an electronic (e-) cohort study and a nationally representative survey. We studied 49,443 French volunteers aged 18-74 years recruited during 2009-2010 in the NutriNet-Santé Study, a general population-based e-cohort study. The Etude Nationale Nutrition Santé (ENNS; 2006-2007), a cross-sectional study with a nationally representative sample of 2,754 French adults aged 18-74 years, served as the reference data set...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Neal D Freedman
In this issue of the Journal, Wyss et al. (Am J Epidemiol. 2016;000(00):000-000) describe the association between use of smokeless tobacco and head and neck cancer in 11 US case-control studies. Despite use by an estimated 300 million people worldwide and prior evidence for a causal association with cancer, these products remain understudied. Data are particularly needed for persons who do not use cigarettes or other smoking tobacco products. With 6,772 cancer cases and 8,375 controls, the current study is larger than previous efforts, allowing evaluation of associations among never cigarette smokers...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Charlotte Jackson, Emilia Vynnycky, Punam Mangtani
School closure is often considered as an influenza control measure, but its effects on transmission are poorly understood. We used 2 approaches to estimate how school holidays affect the contact parameter (the per capita rate of contact sufficient for infection transmission) for influenza using primary care data from England and Wales (1967-2000). Firstly, we fitted an age-structured susceptible-infectious-recovered model to each year's data to estimate the proportional change in the contact parameter during school holidays as compared with termtime...
October 15, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Mohsen Sadatsafavi, Don D Sin, Zafar Zafari, Gerard Criner, John E Connett, Stephen Lazarus, Meilan Han, Fernando Martinez, Richard Albert
Exacerbations are a hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Evidence suggests the presence of substantial between-individual variability (heterogeneity) in exacerbation rates. The question of whether individuals vary in their tendency towards experiencing severe (versus mild) exacerbations, or whether there is an association between exacerbation rate and severity, has not yet been studied. We used data from the MACRO Study, a 1-year randomized trial of the use of azithromycin for prevention of COPD exacerbations (United States and Canada, 2006-2010; n = 1,107, mean age = 65...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
Samuel G Schumacher, Maarten van Smeden, Nandini Dendukuri, Lawrence Joseph, Mark P Nicol, Madhukar Pai, Heather J Zar
Evaluation of tests for the diagnosis of childhood pulmonary tuberculosis (CPTB) is complicated by the absence of an accurate reference test. We present a Bayesian latent class analysis in which we evaluated the accuracy of 5 diagnostic tests for CPTB. We used data from a study of 749 hospitalized South African children suspected to have CPTB from 2009 to 2014. The following tests were used: mycobacterial culture, smear microscopy, Xpert MTB/RIF (Cepheid Inc.), tuberculin skin test (TST), and chest radiography...
October 13, 2016: American Journal of Epidemiology
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